Firearms Training - Sharing Experience (Read 46675 times)

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #300 on: October 18, 2021, 12:21:12 PM »
I guess I’m pretty lucky. I practice once or twice a week doing holster practice with live fire. So far that has been the hardest thing for me to learn. So I practice it the most.

1 thing that I learned from Carry Trainer (IG), is after a SD incident, don't rush to re-holster.  You don't wanna blow chunks of yourself off, especially now under great stress. Take your time.

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #301 on: October 18, 2021, 12:22:35 PM »
I shot next to a trusted instructor/mentor/friend a few times in a firearms class.  First time, it was in a pistol class.  I was shooting decently well that day and when he lined up next to me and gave me a "let's go", I was ready.  It was a simple course of fire with a reload.  Well, totally fumbled the reload. . . In the "debief" later that evening, we joked about it and how I always mentioned wanting to shoot side-by-side with them and see how I stack up.  Just that anticipation of "the chance/challenge" got to me.

See, something as simple as someone standing next to your challenging affects things.  At least you didn't drop the mag after pressing out. Seen this many times at skill builders. Dooohhhh-Maaahhhhhhh

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #302 on: October 18, 2021, 12:37:51 PM »
On a sort of related note, when I take skill builders, I run my kit. Which just plates wise is about 20lbs for 5 hours. By the end of the day, my lower back is noticeably worn out.  But to be fair, I do deadlift every thrusday, so my back is worn out prior to the SB.

For a guy that deadlifts more than your normal person, this is unexceptionable that 20lbs would do this.  So I posted in my 1911 thread that I might upgrade to lighter plates which would bring be down to about 11lbs.

This thought came up when going mainland and taking a weekend class and my hydration issue.  2nd day of class would suck.

There was a show on the history channel about the 75th. 78% of their injuries are lower back related. So they brought in a powerlifter/trainer to see what he could do.  After watching them train, he implemented deadlifting.  The lower back injuries got reduced from 78% to 30%.  Now I see in basic and other types of PT, they have a deadlift bar being used in PT.  This isn't a real deadlift, but same motion. A deadlift with a regular Olympic bar is much harder.  So the one that Bradley Cooper was using in American sniper is what I'm talking about.  The weight he was doing isn't impressive to a weight lifter. #1 that bar makes it way easier, #2 he's doing more of a rack pull (not touching the ground).  Had articles making him sound like a strongman because of the weight he was doing. 

So what's the point of all this, don't forget physical fitness as well.  As we get older, we are more prone to injuries.  So take it slow and be in some shape.  Cause if that fight ends up hand to hand first, then you will need some fitness level.

6716J

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #303 on: October 18, 2021, 12:43:43 PM »
On a sort of related note, when I take skill builders, I run my kit. Which just plates wise is about 20lbs for 5 hours. By the end of the day, my lower back is noticeably worn out.  But to be fair, I do deadlift every thrusday, so my back is worn out prior to the SB.

For a guy that deadlifts more than your normal person, this is unexceptionable that 20lbs would do this.  So I posted in my 1911 thread that I might upgrade to lighter plates which would bring be down to about 11lbs.

This thought came up when going mainland and taking a weekend class and my hydration issue.  2nd day of class would suck.

There was a show on the history channel about the 75th. 78% of their injuries are lower back related. So they brought in a powerlifter/trainer to see what he could do.  After watching them train, he implemented deadlifting.  The lower back injuries got reduced from 78% to 30%.  Now I see in basic and other types of PT, they have a deadlift bar being used in PT.  This isn't a real deadlift, but same motion. A deadlift with a regular Olympic bar is much harder.  So the one that Bradley Cooper was using in American sniper is what I'm talking about.  The weight he was doing isn't impressive to a weight lifter. #1 that bar makes it way easier, #2 he's doing more of a rack pull (not touching the ground).  Had articles making him sound like a strongman because of the weight he was doing. 

So what's the point of all this, don't forget physical fitness as well.  As we get older, we are more prone to injuries.  So take it slow and be in some shape.  Cause if that fight ends up hand to hand first, then you will need some fitness level.
In today's world, more and more are doing BJJ and such so it's in your best interest to be in shape, even if you don't jits. Give yourself a fighting chance.


Hex bar

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #304 on: October 18, 2021, 12:52:55 PM »
In today's world, more and more are doing BJJ and such so it's in your best interest to be in shape, even if you don't jits. Give yourself a fighting chance.


Hex bar

I use this to do shrugs, barbell shrugs rubs the boto. And dumbells don't go heavy enough at my gym.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #305 on: October 18, 2021, 12:53:08 PM »
See, something as simple as someone standing next to your challenging affects things.  At least you didn't drop the mag after pressing out. Seen this many times at skill builders. Dooohhhh-Maaahhhhhhh
A shooting buddy likes to make his own kydex holsters.  They come out quite well in general.  Particularly useful for folks that have handguns that aren't common.  Anyways, there's a lot of thought and testing that goes into those holsters.  While they may fit in general, they need to function properly, or not cause malfunctions.  One particular holster was giving him troubles.  After the draw, his mag would drop free.  This was in both training and handgun matches.  Buzzer, draw, bang, dead trigger, tap rack, click, etc.  It turned out that there was a little bit of kydex that if you drew straight out, no problem.  But his draw had a slight pressure toward his belt and that depressed the mag release.  I swear he came close to going Office Space on his holster and gun one match. 

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #306 on: October 25, 2021, 08:59:48 AM »
Took a HDF skill builder (SB) this weekend with Mrs. CMO. 

1) I increased my hydration amounts thanks to the info that Flapp mentioned. Every break to reload, I chugged about 20oz water and some Liquid IV and Gatorade.  He mentioned when training in the military, they chugged like 2 quarts water every hour or something.  I noticed I was sweating the entire time and only pissed once.  Compared to last SB, I stopped sweating half way thru.  Felt a lot more less fatigued than last SB also.  And also that night and next day I felt way better than last SB, no migraine either.  So hydration, hydration, hydration.  So for the last exercise, I did way better than the last combo SB one. Like night and day kind.  So I attribute this to less fatigue.

2) I tend to watch others when we do group dry fire and I'm taking a breather.  Or when shooting. This way I can learn from their mistakes.  So I know how to deal with it if it happens to me. Because to duplicate the exact problem may never occur.  But this way I'll be ready. 1 thing that SB's did teach me is to work thru the problem. The exercise doesn't stop because of X reason. Figure it out and continue.  Had 1 guy who really grabs his mag quickly from his belt holder. When he does this, the top round comes forward on occasion.  So when trying to load the mag into the AR, it wouldn't go in due to that top protruding half inch.  So gotta recognize when that happens and use your finger to slide the round back, or load AK style which will force that round back further into the mag.

3) Murphy's law strikes again. We were talking about my sling set up to my butt stock.  And I explained why I have the stock that I have.  It's to hold a CR123 battery for my Romeo5 RDS.  I had a battery die on me a few years ago mid class and had to run irons the rest of the class. Which is a huge handicap.  So after explaining this to the instructors, what happens during our first live fire...my RDS craps out again.  So since I've XP'd this before, I instinctively switched to irons.  And because I had the battery on me, I was able to change it out when my turn for shooting was done. Instead of having to wait and walk back to our bags.  The junk part of the Romeo5 is there is no low battery indicator.  I probably lasted changed it pre covid.  Since the rifle was sitting in the safe for most of 2020.

So other than the above, it was a good SB.  Haven't taken 1 with the wife for a while due to her work schedule.  Oh and got to shoot my first shooting comp type of shooting.  Like when you have a barrier and a line you cannot cross to shoot around said barrier. But have to lean as much as you can.   I've never done that before. This is way diff from a VTAC board.  It looks harder than it is.  Even when shooting from support side for rifle or having to shoot pistol from your support side of your body, while maintaining your normal holding of the pistol.

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #307 on: October 25, 2021, 09:26:43 AM »
Took a HDF skill builder (SB) this weekend with Mrs. CMO. 

1) I increased my hydration amounts thanks to the info that Flapp mentioned. Every break to reload, I chugged about 20oz water and some Liquid IV and Gatorade.  He mentioned when training in the military, they chugged like 2 quarts water every hour or something.  I noticed I was sweating the entire time and only pissed once.  Compared to last SB, I stopped sweating half way thru.  Felt a lot more less fatigued than last SB also.  And also that night and next day I felt way better than last SB, no migraine either.  So hydration, hydration, hydration.  So for the last exercise, I did way better than the last combo SB one. Like night and day kind.  So I attribute this to less fatigue.

2) I tend to watch others when we do group dry fire and I'm taking a breather.  Or when shooting. This way I can learn from their mistakes.  So I know how to deal with it if it happens to me. Because to duplicate the exact problem may never occur.  But this way I'll be ready. 1 thing that SB's did teach me is to work thru the problem. The exercise doesn't stop because of X reason. Figure it out and continue.  Had 1 guy who really grabs his mag quickly from his belt holder. When he does this, the top round comes forward on occasion.  So when trying to load the mag into the AR, it wouldn't go in due to that top protruding half inch.  So gotta recognize when that happens and use your finger to slide the round back, or load AK style which will force that round back further into the mag.

3) Murphy's law strikes again. We were talking about my sling set up to my butt stock.  And I explained why I have the stock that I have.  It's to hold a CR123 battery for my Romeo5 RDS.  I had a battery die on me a few years ago mid class and had to run irons the rest of the class. Which is a huge handicap.  So after explaining this to the instructors, what happens during our first live fire...my RDS craps out again.  So since I've XP'd this before, I instinctively switched to irons.  And because I had the battery on me, I was able to change it out when my turn for shooting was done. Instead of having to wait and walk back to our bags.  The junk part of the Romeo5 is there is no low battery indicator.  I probably lasted changed it pre covid.  Since the rifle was sitting in the safe for most of 2020.

So other than the above, it was a good SB.  Haven't taken 1 with the wife for a while due to her work schedule.  Oh and got to shoot my first shooting comp type of shooting.  Like when you have a barrier and a line you cannot cross to shoot around said barrier. But have to lean as much as you can.   I've never done that before. This is way diff from a VTAC board. It looks harder than it is. Even when shooting from support side for rifle or having to shoot pistol from your support side of your body, while maintaining your normal holding of the pistol.

TWSS

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #308 on: October 25, 2021, 10:02:33 AM »
Took a HDF skill builder (SB) this weekend with Mrs. CMO. 

1) I increased my hydration amounts thanks to the info that Flapp mentioned. Every break to reload, I chugged about 20oz water and some Liquid IV and Gatorade.  He mentioned when training in the military, they chugged like 2 quarts water every hour or something.  I noticed I was sweating the entire time and only pissed once.  Compared to last SB, I stopped sweating half way thru.  Felt a lot more less fatigued than last SB also.  And also that night and next day I felt way better than last SB, no migraine either.  So hydration, hydration, hydration.  So for the last exercise, I did way better than the last combo SB one. Like night and day kind.  So I attribute this to less fatigue.

2) I tend to watch others when we do group dry fire and I'm taking a breather.  Or when shooting. This way I can learn from their mistakes.  So I know how to deal with it if it happens to me. Because to duplicate the exact problem may never occur.  But this way I'll be ready. 1 thing that SB's did teach me is to work thru the problem. The exercise doesn't stop because of X reason. Figure it out and continue.  Had 1 guy who really grabs his mag quickly from his belt holder. When he does this, the top round comes forward on occasion.  So when trying to load the mag into the AR, it wouldn't go in due to that top protruding half inch.  So gotta recognize when that happens and use your finger to slide the round back, or load AK style which will force that round back further into the mag.

3) Murphy's law strikes again. We were talking about my sling set up to my butt stock.  And I explained why I have the stock that I have.  It's to hold a CR123 battery for my Romeo5 RDS.  I had a battery die on me a few years ago mid class and had to run irons the rest of the class. Which is a huge handicap.  So after explaining this to the instructors, what happens during our first live fire...my RDS craps out again.  So since I've XP'd this before, I instinctively switched to irons.  And because I had the battery on me, I was able to change it out when my turn for shooting was done. Instead of having to wait and walk back to our bags.  The junk part of the Romeo5 is there is no low battery indicator.  I probably lasted changed it pre covid.  Since the rifle was sitting in the safe for most of 2020.

So other than the above, it was a good SB.  Haven't taken 1 with the wife for a while due to her work schedule.  Oh and got to shoot my first shooting comp type of shooting.  Like when you have a barrier and a line you cannot cross to shoot around said barrier. But have to lean as much as you can.   I've never done that before. This is way diff from a VTAC board.  It looks harder than it is.  Even when shooting from support side for rifle or having to shoot pistol from your support side of your body, while maintaining your normal holding of the pistol.
Thanks for sharing.  Always good to get out there and get some training.

1) Cool.  Hydration is something that is easy to take for granted.  Also often times we don't feel the effects until after it's become a "problem".  I've found that I really need to watch that in drier climates.  I was in Cali for vacation a couple of weeks ago.  It was sunny, but relatively mild weather.  We were walking all around every day.  One day, I noticed I was feeling a bit dehydrated and noticed pee getting darker.  Didn't feel that bad a first, but started to get a headache.  It was slight and tanked a bunch of water and eventually felt fine. 

2) Observing others in classes is something that I tend to do as well.  There are things that folks (includes me too) do that they don't realize.  The first time you see yourself on video can be eye opening.  It was very much so for me when I first saw my golf swing on video.  It was awful. . .

3) You've had your batt fail multiple times in classes?  Yikes.  Now that I say that, I better check the batts on some of my stuff. 

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #309 on: October 26, 2021, 01:40:56 PM »
Thanks for sharing.  Always good to get out there and get some training.


The first time you see yourself on video can be eye opening.  It was very much so for me when I first saw my golf swing on video.  It was awful. . .


Check out HDF or KM Concepts recent post.  I'm 1 of the guys there.  You're right about watching yourself.  I thought I was reloading much faster. And watching from 3rd person, looks like I could have sped up a little. I did the reloads at a comfortable pace.  Also noticed I could be reaching for my pistol as soon as my right hand lets go of the AR.  But I waited until the rifle was totally out of the way.  Again, didn't feel like it in the moment.  Final change would have been to take the 1st shot from the pistol faster, which is when I'm most accurate. But since I was ahead, I decided to slow down, and missed.  The guy shooting against me is a much better shot.  Like JV vs. Varsity.  But he just had a very bad run.  He smoked me in the next exercise.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #310 on: October 26, 2021, 01:56:12 PM »
Check out HDF or KM Concepts recent post.  I'm 1 of the guys there.  You're right about watching yourself.  I thought I was reloading much faster. And watching from 3rd person, looks like I could have sped up a little. I did the reloads at a comfortable pace.  Also noticed I could be reaching for my pistol as soon as my right hand lets go of the AR.  But I waited until the rifle was totally out of the way.  Again, didn't feel like it in the moment.  Final change would have been to take the 1st shot from the pistol faster, which is when I'm most accurate. But since I was ahead, I decided to slow down, and missed.  The guy shooting against me is a much better shot.  Like JV vs. Varsity.  But he just had a very bad run.  He smoked me in the next exercise.
I saw.  You didn't see my comments on that post?   ???



changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #311 on: November 29, 2021, 09:20:09 AM »
Took a carbine skill builder hosted by HDF this past Saturday.

This time I chugged 1 Liquid IV prior to leaving the house.  And I drank another 2 during the SB and more plain water.  I was pissing during every reloading break. So about 6 times for during the SB. Which I rather do that than feel like crap for a few days after (migraine, exhaustion, etc...).  It wasn't too sunny, combo overcast and some sun.

Had no focus on 1 of the exercises.  Instructions were to reload once during, I didn't focus and did a reload from the start.  So started exercise with empty mag.  This cause a DQ, which sucked because either way, it really wouldn't have affected the total time if I reloaded now or later.  Plus I got all hits, so no penalties. 

My other times for the other exercises weren't the best, but I was focused on getting hits as well as reloading fast and re-engaging.  Where I could tell others were just focused on getting fast reload times, but missing the target lots.  So there is a balancing aspect of being fast and accurate.  I rather be accurate IMO cause every missed shot could be a potential lawsuit.

Still want lighter plates, cause I missed my deadlift day due to Thanksgiving, so the lower back was extra shot due to 1 less day of recovery time.  But right now, the price doesn't justify the once a month usage for weight reduction. DFNDR is still on my top. I would go from 24lbs total (front,rear and side plates) to 13lbs. But at a cost of $1500.  $1K for the front and rear plates, and $500 for sides.  Their black friday and cyber Monday sales weren't that great, about 15% off.

6716J

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #312 on: November 29, 2021, 10:42:55 AM »
Took a carbine skill builder hosted by HDF this past Saturday.

This time I chugged 1 Liquid IV prior to leaving the house.  And I drank another 2 during the SB and more plain water.  I was pissing during every reloading break. So about 6 times for during the SB. Which I rather do that than feel like crap for a few days after (migraine, exhaustion, etc...).  It wasn't too sunny, combo overcast and some sun.

Had no focus on 1 of the exercises.  Instructions were to reload once during, I didn't focus and did a reload from the start.  So started exercise with empty mag.  This cause a DQ, which sucked because either way, it really wouldn't have affected the total time if I reloaded now or later.  Plus I got all hits, so no penalties. 

My other times for the other exercises weren't the best, but I was focused on getting hits as well as reloading fast and re-engaging.  Where I could tell others were just focused on getting fast reload times, but missing the target lots.  So there is a balancing aspect of being fast and accurate.  I rather be accurate IMO cause every missed shot could be a potential lawsuit.

Still want lighter plates, cause I missed my deadlift day due to Thanksgiving, so the lower back was extra shot due to 1 less day of recovery time.  But right now, the price doesn't justify the once a month usage for weight reduction. DFNDR is still on my top. I would go from 24lbs total (front,rear and side plates) to 13lbs. But at a cost of $1500.  $1K for the front and rear plates, and $500 for sides.  Their black friday and cyber Monday sales weren't that great, about 15% off.

Try the HESCO L210 at $310 shipped to Hawaii

https://sierratac.com/product/hesco-200-series-armor-level-rifle-special-threat-stand-alone-plate-l210/
The Hesco L210 plate is an exceptional value balancing light weight, thinness, cost, and ballistic protection.  The L210 is 5.5 lbs., .59″ thick and value priced.  The L210 ballistic ratings include: 5.56 in M193 and M855/Green Tip, M855A1 Enhanced, 7.62×39 in Lead and Mild Steel Core, and Armor Piercing Incendiary.  Overall, a very nice balance of cost, weight, thickness, and ballistic protection.  $5 dollar shipping available. In stock and ready to ship.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #313 on: November 29, 2021, 11:00:42 AM »
Try the HESCO L210 at $310 shipped to Hawaii

https://sierratac.com/product/hesco-200-series-armor-level-rifle-special-threat-stand-alone-plate-l210/
The Hesco L210 plate is an exceptional value balancing light weight, thinness, cost, and ballistic protection.  The L210 is 5.5 lbs., .59″ thick and value priced.  The L210 ballistic ratings include: 5.56 in M193 and M855/Green Tip, M855A1 Enhanced, 7.62×39 in Lead and Mild Steel Core, and Armor Piercing Incendiary.  Overall, a very nice balance of cost, weight, thickness, and ballistic protection.  $5 dollar shipping available. In stock and ready to ship.
T-Rex had (I think still going on now) a sale for HESCO.  Not sure if that comes out better pricing, but another opportunity for CMO to same some $$$ for purple plate carrier. 

Rocky

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #314 on: November 29, 2021, 11:34:26 AM »
another opportunity for CMO to same save some $$$ for purple plate carrier.
Ain't purple but great for helicopter rides !


“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #315 on: November 29, 2021, 12:23:08 PM »
Took a carbine skill builder hosted by HDF this past Saturday.

This time I chugged 1 Liquid IV prior to leaving the house.  And I drank another 2 during the SB and more plain water.  I was pissing during every reloading break. So about 6 times for during the SB. Which I rather do that than feel like crap for a few days after (migraine, exhaustion, etc...).  It wasn't too sunny, combo overcast and some sun.

Had no focus on 1 of the exercises.  Instructions were to reload once during, I didn't focus and did a reload from the start.  So started exercise with empty mag.  This cause a DQ, which sucked because either way, it really wouldn't have affected the total time if I reloaded now or later.  Plus I got all hits, so no penalties. 

My other times for the other exercises weren't the best, but I was focused on getting hits as well as reloading fast and re-engaging.  Where I could tell others were just focused on getting fast reload times, but missing the target lots.  So there is a balancing aspect of being fast and accurate.  I rather be accurate IMO cause every missed shot could be a potential lawsuit.

Still want lighter plates, cause I missed my deadlift day due to Thanksgiving, so the lower back was extra shot due to 1 less day of recovery time.  But right now, the price doesn't justify the once a month usage for weight reduction. DFNDR is still on my top. I would go from 24lbs total (front,rear and side plates) to 13lbs. But at a cost of $1500.  $1K for the front and rear plates, and $500 for sides.  Their black friday and cyber Monday sales weren't that great, about 15% off.
The weather seemed pretty nice for shooting in the action bays this past weekend.   :thumbsup:

For the "no focus" moment.  Do you attribute that to not paying attention to instructions?  Just a goof?  What?  Attentiveness to instructions on a competitive level is one thing, but I also do notice stuff like that in terms of overall shooting.  As in where is your mind.  I agree and appreciate with the "get your hits" and accountability for shot placement (for obvious reasons and like you said) and something I tell myself to always be mindful on.  Where manipulations like reloading should be unconscious and not have to focus so much on that as opposed to the task at hand (course of fire).  Or at least a goal for training. 

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #316 on: November 29, 2021, 12:23:41 PM »
Ain't purple but great for helicopter rides !

SNIP
Protecting the wrong head. . . or maybe depends on perspective. . .  ;D

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #317 on: November 29, 2021, 12:46:57 PM »
The weather seemed pretty nice for shooting in the action bays this past weekend.   :thumbsup:

For the "no focus" moment.  Do you attribute that to not paying attention to instructions?  Just a goof?  What?  Attentiveness to instructions on a competitive level is one thing, but I also do notice stuff like that in terms of overall shooting.  As in where is your mind.  I agree and appreciate with the "get your hits" and accountability for shot placement (for obvious reasons and like you said) and something I tell myself to always be mindful on.  Where manipulations like reloading should be unconscious and not have to focus so much on that as opposed to the task at hand (course of fire).  Or at least a goal for training.

For the NF moment, I thought I was being a smart ass.  I didn't hear the "reload between shot groups 1 and 3".  The exercise was 3 groups of 3 shots in each group. So a total of 9 rds is fired.

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #318 on: November 29, 2021, 12:51:35 PM »
For the NF moment, I thought I was being a smart ass.  I didn't hear the "reload between shot groups 1 and 3".  The exercise was 3 groups of 3 shots in each group. So a total of 9 rds is fired.

"mandatory reload between shots one and nine"
focus

Bota-CS1

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #319 on: November 30, 2021, 02:06:51 PM »
"mandatory reload between shots one and nine"
focus

Too much or too little Adderall….
No one is coming, it’s up to us.

Legislation should never be about depriving law abiding citizens of something, but rather taking those things away from criminals.