what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency (Read 7841 times)

newguy86

what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« on: November 14, 2016, 10:31:30 AM »
What dose everyone keep on hand here , i got a good amount of wise company foods, looking for more input on other brands, also got loads of spam, mre, rice, and beans,soups,noodles,etc. aquaponic is on hold till my get surgery on my eye, but hopefully i get it working in a few weeks

oldfart

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2016, 10:56:03 AM »
A reasonable supply of canned goods.
A few cases of mre's.
Approximately 50 gal. Water
A couple of long term food buckets.

Remember to rotate your stock.
What, Me Worry?

passivekinetic

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2016, 02:54:24 PM »
Beef jerky is good.

I've found that drying it yourself is a real hassle and not even half as good as store bought.

Just wait for sales.
"The sheep fear sheepdogs, because they fail to see the wolves."
- Anonymous

Surf

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2016, 06:28:45 PM »
A lot of the Wise food.  I will say that my Wise food and many others who have it notice quite a bit of salt, so cutting it with a starch like rice, potatoes (instant mashed), not only makes it go farther, but makes it more palatable over the long haul. 

Also keeping large amounts of rice, beans, sugar, salt, saimin, Krusteaz mix, canned foods, dryed foods are a good idea.  I also do canning.  Some stuff has a long shelf life if package correctly, but as has been mentioned rotate from front to rear.

Water is also obvious, but I also rotate bulk packages of the crystal light and ice tea packages found at Costco or Sams.  Water only could get boring.  Nice to have something different.

whynow?

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2016, 10:31:37 PM »
I got Mountain House freeze dried food in #10 cans.  The oldest being for Y2K.   Also keep a supply of canned goods that I try to rotate.   Try to choose the longest shelf life possible.  Vienna sausage, pork & beans and baked beans are the main items along with canned soups.
One day I will try making hard tack bread which can last years as a emergency starch item but for now I vacuum seal Diamond brand saloon pilot crackers.   Recently bought  a rocket stove and saw videos of making pita bread which looked easy, but long term storage of flour may be a problem.

eyeeatingfish

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2016, 09:27:57 PM »
I have two buckets of Wise Food storage which should be 2 weeks for a 4 person family. I have another bucket of Mountain House I bought at the gun show from Zippz I think. I have 3 cases of MREs and whatever canned goods are in my pantry, your average amount.

newguy86

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2016, 06:28:14 PM »
How is the mountain house #10 can when open? Is it a one time use or can u use same and save the real for later?

whynow?

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2016, 09:56:26 PM »
How is the mountain house #10 can when open? Is it a one time use or can u use same and save the real for later?
I never opened one yet but would think that you can vacuum seal the unused portion.  #10 size is better for family size unit instead of an individual or two.

eyeeatingfish

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2016, 01:41:12 PM »
Remember that if you have freeze dried emergency food that you will need extra potable water in order to make the food. Thats why in my emergency food kit I make sure to put in some water treatment options,

passivekinetic

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2016, 05:02:31 PM »
How is the mountain house #10 can when open? Is it a one time use or can u use same and save the real for later?

"It depends"

Basically, freeze dried has a certain lifespan.

Then, when you expose it to air, depending on the humidity, that lifespan is reduced.

The more water absorbed, the shorter the lifespan.

Plus, even after sealing it back (and assuming you even can seal it real tight) it's a toss-up how long before this now semi-wet mush will rot.

Heat will also add to this calculation, plus also what the specific ingredients are that absorbed the air humidity.

Myself, I would probably not go longer than 1 or 2 months max after opening such a can, and even that is just a rough guess.

If you don't expect to use up the whole #10 can, better buy smaller portions.
"The sheep fear sheepdogs, because they fail to see the wolves."
- Anonymous

passivekinetic

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2016, 05:04:42 PM »
Remember that if you have freeze dried emergency food that you will need extra potable water in order to make the food. Thats why in my emergency food kit I make sure to put in some water treatment options,

If you have unlimited fuel (e.g., tons of burnable material around), you can make a distiller.

It is very fuel inefficient but if you have lots of fuel, you can make such a thing from almost any water container and lid, and have a condenser to cool and catch the steam.

Here in Hawaii we can always distill sea water. Not a problem.

You can even rig up a solar reflector boiler. Will take time and hassle, but doable.
"The sheep fear sheepdogs, because they fail to see the wolves."
- Anonymous

whynow?

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2016, 11:01:39 PM »
If you have unlimited fuel (e.g., tons of burnable material around), you can make a distiller.

It is very fuel inefficient but if you have lots of fuel, you can make such a thing from almost any water container and lid, and have a condenser to cool and catch the steam.

Here in Hawaii we can always distill sea water. Not a problem.

You can even rig up a solar reflector boiler. Will take time and hassle, but doable.
I got the rocket stove to use with a still which distills water.   They claim even water contaminated with heavy metals or radionuclides can be distilled safely along with sea water.   Also plan to leave containers outside to catch water for the frequent mauka showers here.  Also have a Sawyer filter system  but believe that distilling is the safest means of providing potable water.  If enough warning time, I will fill every container, cup, cooler, rubbish cans or whatever in my house including water bobs in the tubs.   On a normal basis I just keep 1 55 gal .drum and 5 ea. 5 gal' jugs filled and rotate every August.
Got hale koa, kiawe and black pine growing in the back so plenty of fuel.  Can even burn charcoal in the rocket stove.

passivekinetic

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2016, 01:45:06 PM »
Which still you bought?

The quality ones are expensive. So, if I do it I will just rig one up with a kettle (just remove the whistle part and use aluminum foil to condense the steam to a container.

The Waterwise stove still is I think $500 or something like that.
"The sheep fear sheepdogs, because they fail to see the wolves."
- Anonymous

Wave Twister

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2016, 02:09:26 PM »
Any good prices sources for your mre, wise foods, etc?

Just been looking typical Amazon, ebay, but if you guys got better please share :shaka:

whynow?

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #14 on: November 18, 2016, 06:17:17 PM »
Which still you bought?

The quality ones are expensive. So, if I do it I will just rig one up with a kettle (just remove the whistle part and use aluminum foil to condense the steam to a container.

The Waterwise stove still is I think $500 or something like that.
Bought the Survival Still.  Was recommended by Safecastle which is a prepper supply site which has a large following on TB2K forum.   It's non-electric and recommended to use a rocket stove as heat source due to the heat output. 
Bought it from the maker during a webinar special, under $300 including their top and bottom pots.  Bought the Ecozoom Versa stove from Amazon.  Wanted to make my own stove but from what I researched, the price of refractory bricks was too expensive.
My bad but I haven't tested it out yet.  The bottom pot holds the contaminated water which heats up and condenses onto the top pot which holds colder water and the distilled water drips out to your container.
Below is a video of the stove.  youtube has more videos.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwLMCIQ434w

Any good prices sources for your mre, wise foods, etc?
Just been looking typical Amazon, ebay, but if you guys got better please share :shaka:
I got my Mountainhouse foods and canned butter from Safecastle.  They are out of CA (used to be FL).  They have specials often.  Worthwhile to join their lifetime membership for one time $49 cost to get member pricing.  Depending what you buy, shipping  for cases of Mountain House in #10 cans is not cheap but they don't gouge HI and is fair.   As passivekinetic said, you should get portions suitable for the amount of people you need to feed.  #10 cans are like Costco portions.
Do some google research on Safecastle and you'll find they're GTG.  I bought my first MH order in 1999 and my second in 2010.

Rocky

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2016, 08:47:17 PM »
Quote from: Rocky on November 15, 2013, 10:49:23 AM
   As a Prepper, it’s not the Zombie Apocalypse, Collapse of the Economy, or even Alien Invaders I fear, not even Broke Alien Zombies !
It’s something more natural, plausible and most likely to occur.
   Who cannot help but to think what our situation here in Hawaii would be should a decent sized Tsunami or Hurricane hit the islands (again).
   Worst case scenario in my eyes is the Big island drift drop with Tsunami (arriving Oahu in 10-12 minutes) wiping out Honolulu, including seaport and airport.

   I know I don’t want to be on the Governments Fema Vacation Plan !   :wacko:

   With that in mind, here are my preps.

#1 is water.

   Our BOB’s each contain a Seychelle 28-ounce Water Filtration Bottle
This filtration bottle removes up to 99.99 percent of pollutants and contaminants found in water. Produces up to 100 gallons of filtered water.
$16.00
http://www.seychelle.com/
   We also each have a 2 litre bottle of store bought.
I have considered downsizing this 50% due to weight.

   At home and at our BOL, we have Monolithic brand water filters.
Build a Berkey for about $20.00 plus containers.
I splurged for two new 5 gallon buckets w/lids (another $20.00) but you could mount these puppies on 55 gal bbls if you wanted
http://shop.monolithic.com/

   Here’s a real interesting page from the inside of Katrina.
Undoubtedly some of THE BEST prepper info I’ve ever read because it’s written after the fact, from personal LOSS experience !

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/0007.html   :thumbsup:

# 2 is Food.
In the movies, you always see the cowboys eating beans so I thought that I should have plenty as my main staple.
WRONG.
Though man does not live by bread alone, wheat(s) are the most important food staple you need.
Almost 5 times more than beans and 1-1/2 times more than fruits and veggies.
These include wheat , rice, corn, pasta's and oats

    I tend to stock up from the LDS cannery in Kalihi. Great place, nice folks and you don't have to change your beliefs to shop there.    :worship:
( I think their idea is if you're already prepared, you won't need to  try and take mine).
Wish I would have known about this place when i was raising my kids as I would have saved a bundle !
The prices are great averaging about a $1.00 a lb overall on most items.    :o
Red and White wheat, pinto, black, and refried beans, dried milk, onoins, carrots, sugar, oats, pasta, rice flour and more.
Buy in bulk along with their Mylar bags and Oxy absorbers and package your own or get the pre-packed #10 cans.
Pre-packed or DIY, shelf life ranges 10-30 yrs for most items.Order form attached but prices may differ slightly (old form).
 
  On a side note, Unless you're ahead of the game and already have been on a "Healthy diet" your body is already acclimated to processed foods BIG TIME !
DO NOT   try to bake bread solely out of hard red wheat ! It will make a weeks worth of MRE's seem like a laxative.  :shake:
Naturally a grinder is required to flour out of the wheat berries
I still grind flour  3-1 white to red wheat.
Then of course is the stash of canned fish, meats, vegetables, mushrooms, spices and honey bought bulk from Costco and rotated faithfully through our pantry.

  On the other end of the scale is the "emergency" and freeze dried foods which have a pretty good shelf life for most products but  I find them rather expensive.
Doesn't mean I don't have any,  just that  they are truly stashed and not rotated into our diet.
   
   One I will promote is the SOS Foods.  :thumbsup:
Basic info below, prices may vary upon provider.
400, 2400 OR 3600 Calorie Emergency Food Bars
The SOS Emergency Food Rations are US Coast Guard approved and have a shelf life of 5 years from the date of manufacture and can withstand temperatures from -22°F to 149°F.
Non-thirst provoking formula offers maximum survival capacity with drinking water restriction under all environmental conditions.
2400 cal $3.95 ea- $139.00 CASE OF 40    $3.47 ea
3600 cal $5.95 ea  $105.00 CASE OF 20   $54.5 ea
New Millennium Energy Bar - fruity flavors such as orange, lemon, cherry, apricot, tropical fruit, blueberry, coconut, raspberry and vanilla.
200 cal $1.25  CASE OF 144 $149.00
Got the calories, enviromentally stable, fair shelf life, water not necessary, light, compact, packeged air tight and water proof, not expensive and they don't taste that bad.
Regular ones taste kinda like short bread and the millenium flavors don't gag you with sweetness.
I keep these guys at home, in our vehicles, BOB's and BOL.

   I'm going to jump into another topic intended for later entitled reading and education but I think the following is so important, it should be divulged asap.
LDS also has a "Prep Manual" out that is packed with awesome and pertinant info.
https://www.ldsavow.com/PrepManualGeneral.html    :love:
So much to do with food choices, amounts, storage, shelf life, canning, cooking, dietary information etc....  it's mind boggling
The first 14 pages are pretty much faith oriented with a peppering of the same for the next 15 informative pages.
The last 10 pages are of a personal view by the author.
The other 460 pages is some of THE BEST prepper info I've come across since my personal favorite, "Listening to Katrina".
http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/0007.html

Happy to share, more to come, open to suggestion.

   Semper paratu, in orbe terrum non visi
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

Surf

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2016, 09:12:51 PM »
Distilling water isn't as easy / practical as it sounds.

passivekinetic

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2016, 10:08:24 PM »
Distilling water isn't as easy / practical as it sounds.

Agree. Takes a ton of fuel and takes ages.

That's why the caveat is that one must have tons of fuel, and also tons of time (and tons of dirty water).

But that's why it's possible for Hawaii. Tons of seawater, tons of sunlight.
"The sheep fear sheepdogs, because they fail to see the wolves."
- Anonymous

Surf

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2016, 07:54:18 AM »
For arguments sake, lets assume we are in some situation where we are down to distilling water.  Lets say that goes a bit longer term.  Getting "tons" or a lot of seawater from point A to point B will not be easy.  If situations are that bad sitting by the ocean and distilling it and you might need some good security.  Imagine having to do that on a daily basis for hours each day.  There are many other needs to be looked at also.  In many instances, distilling is not an easy or often practical solution.

Try it out for awhile under ideal circumstances, then imagine having to do that when maybe we don't have fuel for vehicles and people are not so friendly.  Being close to a freshwater source if possible and filtration or purification is more ideal.  Of course having redundancy is not a bad thing.  I just think not everyone has a practical idea of what it takes to do things under true survival conditions.

whynow?

Re: what kinds of food dose everyone keep on hand for emergency
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2016, 08:19:57 AM »
Quote from: Rocky on November 15, 2013, 10:49:23 AM
   As a Prepper, it’s not the Zombie Apocalypse, Collapse of the Economy, or even Alien Invaders I fear, not even Broke Alien Zombies !
It’s something more natural, plausible and most likely to occur.
   Who cannot help but to think what our situation here in Hawaii would be should a decent sized Tsunami or Hurricane hit the islands (again).
   Worst case scenario in my eyes is the Big island drift drop with Tsunami (arriving Oahu in 10-12 minutes) wiping out Honolulu, including seaport and airport.

   I know I don’t want to be on the Governments Fema Vacation Plan !   :wacko:

   With that in mind, here are my preps.

#1 is water.

   Our BOB’s each contain a Seychelle 28-ounce Water Filtration Bottle
This filtration bottle removes up to 99.99 percent of pollutants and contaminants found in water. Produces up to 100 gallons of filtered water.
$16.00
http://www.seychelle.com/
   We also each have a 2 litre bottle of store bought.
I have considered downsizing this 50% due to weight.

   At home and at our BOL, we have Monolithic brand water filters.
Build a Berkey for about $20.00 plus containers.
I splurged for two new 5 gallon buckets w/lids (another $20.00) but you could mount these puppies on 55 gal bbls if you wanted
http://shop.monolithic.com/

   Here’s a real interesting page from the inside of Katrina.
Undoubtedly some of THE BEST prepper info I’ve ever read because it’s written after the fact, from personal LOSS experience !

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/0007.html   :thumbsup:

# 2 is Food.
In the movies, you always see the cowboys eating beans so I thought that I should have plenty as my main staple.
WRONG.
Though man does not live by bread alone, wheat(s) are the most important food staple you need.
Almost 5 times more than beans and 1-1/2 times more than fruits and veggies.
These include wheat , rice, corn, pasta's and oats

    I tend to stock up from the LDS cannery in Kalihi. Great place, nice folks and you don't have to change your beliefs to shop there.    :worship:
( I think their idea is if you're already prepared, you won't need to  try and take mine).
Wish I would have known about this place when i was raising my kids as I would have saved a bundle !
The prices are great averaging about a $1.00 a lb overall on most items.    :o
Red and White wheat, pinto, black, and refried beans, dried milk, onoins, carrots, sugar, oats, pasta, rice flour and more.
Buy in bulk along with their Mylar bags and Oxy absorbers and package your own or get the pre-packed #10 cans.
Pre-packed or DIY, shelf life ranges 10-30 yrs for most items.Order form attached but prices may differ slightly (old form).
 
  On a side note, Unless you're ahead of the game and already have been on a "Healthy diet" your body is already acclimated to processed foods BIG TIME !
DO NOT   try to bake bread solely out of hard red wheat ! It will make a weeks worth of MRE's seem like a laxative.  :shake:
Naturally a grinder is required to flour out of the wheat berries
I still grind flour  3-1 white to red wheat.
Then of course is the stash of canned fish, meats, vegetables, mushrooms, spices and honey bought bulk from Costco and rotated faithfully through our pantry.

  On the other end of the scale is the "emergency" and freeze dried foods which have a pretty good shelf life for most products but  I find them rather expensive.
Doesn't mean I don't have any,  just that  they are truly stashed and not rotated into our diet.
   
   One I will promote is the SOS Foods.  :thumbsup:
Basic info below, prices may vary upon provider.
400, 2400 OR 3600 Calorie Emergency Food Bars
The SOS Emergency Food Rations are US Coast Guard approved and have a shelf life of 5 years from the date of manufacture and can withstand temperatures from -22°F to 149°F.
Non-thirst provoking formula offers maximum survival capacity with drinking water restriction under all environmental conditions.
2400 cal $3.95 ea- $139.00 CASE OF 40    $3.47 ea
3600 cal $5.95 ea  $105.00 CASE OF 20   $54.5 ea
New Millennium Energy Bar - fruity flavors such as orange, lemon, cherry, apricot, tropical fruit, blueberry, coconut, raspberry and vanilla.
200 cal $1.25  CASE OF 144 $149.00
Got the calories, enviromentally stable, fair shelf life, water not necessary, light, compact, packeged air tight and water proof, not expensive and they don't taste that bad.
Regular ones taste kinda like short bread and the millenium flavors don't gag you with sweetness.
I keep these guys at home, in our vehicles, BOB's and BOL.

   I'm going to jump into another topic intended for later entitled reading and education but I think the following is so important, it should be divulged asap.
LDS also has a "Prep Manual" out that is packed with awesome and pertinant info.
https://www.ldsavow.com/PrepManualGeneral.html    :love:
So much to do with food choices, amounts, storage, shelf life, canning, cooking, dietary information etc....  it's mind boggling
The first 14 pages are pretty much faith oriented with a peppering of the same for the next 15 informative pages.
The last 10 pages are of a personal view by the author.
The other 460 pages is some of THE BEST prepper info I've come across since my personal favorite, "Listening to Katrina".
http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/0007.html

Happy to share, more to come, open to suggestion.

   Semper paratu, in orbe terrum non visi
Rocky, thanks for all the links and suggestions.   Might check out the LDS store for wheat, flour storage ideas.  I'm always open to new ideas in this topic and always learning.