AR Controversy (Read 3013 times)

redryderbb

AR Controversy
« on: April 24, 2014, 12:57:01 AM »
Not sure if this is a repost or a thread already has been posted.  I'm pretty new to AR's and I find this very interesting.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/nightline-fix-abc-news/homemade-guns-legal-unregistered-kill-133152516.html?vp=1

Surf

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2014, 04:59:52 PM »
Could you elaborate and perhaps explain what in particular you find to be interesting?  It is hard to make a generic reply.   

zippz

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2014, 06:00:48 PM »
They've been out for a while, just that with AR15 and lower receiver prices coming down a lot, most people would just buy a built one.  I could see a few criminals buying the kits, but I would think they would rather steal one than put in the time to build one.

You would still have to register it with the PD when you finish it.  I'm surprised there haven't been any bills to ban them yet.  Of course once they do, someone will come out with a 79% receiver.
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justin1098

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2014, 07:01:04 PM »
Has the gun control act of 1968 kept guns out of the hands of criminals?

SOLEsource684

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2014, 07:42:25 PM »
Has the gun control act of 1968 kept guns out of the hands of criminals?

Oh yes they have! Infact, the Federal Government has done such a tremendous job that the ATF felt bad and decided to give the Mexican drug cartels weapons to use for their criminal activity. :thumbsup:

redryderbb

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2014, 10:44:38 PM »
Could you elaborate and perhaps explain what in particular you find to be interesting?  It is hard to make a generic reply.   

Please bear with me as I am not like other AR guru's on here and I am still learning about AR's.  I just find everything interesting from the reading and watching the video.  But mostly it was the 80% lower receiver that got me  ???  I didn't even know such a thing existed, especially those plastic 80% lower receivers. 

suka

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2014, 10:59:14 PM »
Manufacturing firearms has always been legal since before 1776.
in 1932 , some items were regulated and taxed. (NFA)
in 1968, most all firearms were required to have S/N and taxed (GCA)
in 1986, manufacturing new machine guns were regulated (FOPA)
in 1989, import ban
in 1994, AWB
....etc

s197

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2014, 08:28:35 AM »
Please bear with me as I am not like other AR guru's on here and I am still learning about AR's.  I just find everything interesting from the reading and watching the video.  But mostly it was the 80% lower receiver that got me  ???  I didn't even know such a thing existed, especially those plastic 80% lower receivers.

They even have handguns that you can 3D print. 

Surf

Re: AR Controversy
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2014, 12:42:27 PM »
Please bear with me as I am not like other AR guru's on here and I am still learning about AR's.  I just find everything interesting from the reading and watching the video.  But mostly it was the 80% lower receiver that got me  ???  I didn't even know such a thing existed, especially those plastic 80% lower receivers.
Not a problem and I hope my post didn't come across poorly, I was simply trying to understand what point(s) you were interested in discussing as there are quite a few topics for discussion within that blog and perhaps in regards to the potential message bias in the blog and / or video. 

For the 80% lowers, they have been around for quite some time.  I will note that Dimitri from Ares Armor has done quite a bit with his business and popularizing the 80% lower in a more mainstream way within the shooting community.  People have been legally making their own firearms for personal use / ownership for a long long long long time and there is nothing wrong with that as far as the ATF is concerned and provided that you are also following all local laws it is no big deal.  Making a weapon usually depends on individual skills and tooling but plans are out there to follow. 

Indeed the process for making the AR/M4 platform of rifle was simplified a bit with the advent of the 80% lower, but again according to current ATF guidelines a true 80% lower is still just a paper weight or hunk of metal or plastic.  The issue with Ares Armor goes beyond legality, but more than likely goes into politics and personality conflicts getting it to this point.  The problem really peaked when it came to the two tone polymer lowers in that the ATF claimed that the process for making those particular two tone 80% lowers were in that the injection molding process the lower was at one point allegedly classified as a firearm and then the second polymer interior color was added to take it back to an 80% lower.  If my understanding is correct on how this two tone lowers are produced in the injection molding process, is that they never broach the 80% mark. 

Again and I will just speculate, that I believe that many are not happy about how easily the 80% polymer lowers are finished even if no laws are being violated.  I am sure that these concerns are exacerbated by the hoopla over 3D printing right now and how to regulate that.  It is no secret that the City in which Ares does business wants to shut him down so the political undertones are huge here.  I would also speculate that he pissed off people not just within the political arena but within Federal LE areas and that is surely complicating matters for him.  Not saying it is right if that is what is happening as that is completely wrong to get pressure because you pissed someone off, but none the less a reality he is probably facing.