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Messages - 6716J

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1
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 22, 2020, 05:39:05 PM »
As I read it the law only applies to non-serialized 80% firearms. Law requires a serial number on an 80% firearm but it doesn't say you can't have a serial number on an 80% firearm.  So if a 80% part manufacturer put a serial number on it prior to purchase then it would seem to not apply. So if you buy a chunk of steel or aluminum you plan to make into a firearm then engrave a serial number first and you would seem to be fine? Gotta double check the text of the law but this would seem to be a workaround.

This is exactly how it works and what I said earlier. IT IS LEGAL to get these and assemble them AS LONG AS YOU SERIALIZE/REGISTER THEM. And it does not say who puts it on. WORDS MATTER.

SECTION 3.  Chapter 134, Hawaii Revised Statutes, is amended by adding a new section to part I to be appropriately designated and to read as follows:

     "§134-    Manufacturing, purchasing, or obtaining firearm parts to assemble a firearm having no serial number; penalty.  (a)  A person who is not licensed to manufacture a firearm under section 134-31, or who is not a dealer licensed by the United States Department of Justice, shall not, for the purpose of assembling a firearm (if that is not your purpose for purchase, then it's not against the law), purchase, produce with a three-dimensional printer, or otherwise obtain separately, or as part of a kit:

     (1)  A firearm receiver that is not imprinted with a serial number registered with a federally licensed manufacturer;

     (2)  A firearm receiver that has not been provided a serial number that may be registered in accordance with section 134-3(c); or(This is where you put your own serial number in the event you ever change your mind on assembling)

     (3)  Any combination of parts from which a firearm having no serial number may be readily assembled; provided that the parts do not have the capacity to function as a firearm unless assembled.

     (b)  Violation of this section is a class C felony."

     SECTION 4.  Section 134-1, Hawaii Revised Statutes, is amended by adding two new definitions to be appropriately inserted and to read as follows:

     ""Assembly" means the fabrication of a firearm or the fitting together of component parts to construct a firearm.

     "Firearm receiver" means the part of a firearm that provides housing for the firearm's internal components, including a hammer, bolt, breechblock, action, or firing mechanism.  "Firearm receiver" includes any object or part that is not a firearm frame or receiver in finished form but that is designed or intended to be used for that purpose and may readily be made into a firearm frame or receiver through milling or other means."

§134-2  Permits to acquire.  (a)  No person shall acquire the ownership of a firearm (80% IS NOT A FIREARM AND NEVER WAS and is incapable of being used as such), whether usable or unusable, serviceable or unserviceable, modern or antique, registered under prior law or by a prior owner or unregistered, either by purchase, gift, inheritance, bequest, or in any other manner,
2
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 17, 2020, 03:22:55 PM »
And nowhere does it say anything about permits to acquire an 80%
3
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 15, 2020, 05:45:57 PM »
Meanwhile Downtown

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4
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 14, 2020, 04:14:58 PM »
Another interpretation can be that you can still purchase them freely at any gun store or via the internet. The key to all of this is sentence 2:

"§134-    Manufacturing, purchasing, or obtaining firearm parts to assemble a firearm having no serial number; penalty.  (a)  A person who is not licensed to manufacture a firearm under section 134-31, or who is not a dealer licensed by the United States Department of Justice, shall not, for the purpose of assembling a firearm (what if I don't intend to assemble a firearm in Hawaii?), purchase, produce with a three-dimensional printer, or otherwise obtain separately, or as part of a kit:

     (1)  A firearm receiver that is not imprinted with a serial number registered with a federally licensed manufacturer;

    (2)  A firearm receiver that has not been provided a serial number that may be registered in accordance with section 134-3(c); or

     (3)  Any combination of parts from which a firearm having no serial number may be readily assembled; provided that the parts do not have the capacity to function as a firearm unless assembled."

...meaning, if you put a serial number on the piece of plastic/metal FIRST before you begin any milling or drilling, you are in compliance with the law as written.

And while they have attempted to define a firearm receiver..."Firearm receiver" includes any object or part that is not a firearm frame or receiver in finished form but that is designed or intended to be used for that purpose and may readily be made into a firearm frame or receiver through milling or other means." they have never defined the term readily. And that has been asked for eons and as for intent, if I go into Home Depot and purchase a 10x12 piece of 12 gauge sheet metal with the INTENT to make an AK rifle out of it, can HD sell it to me? A piece of steel tube to make a STEN. They aren't an FFL , but are selling firearm parts.

Poorly written laws have unintended consequences

unless I am wrong (and I've been known to be, ask my wife), you still DO NOT NEED a permit to acquire an 80% . It only states it must have a MFRs serial number (no. 1), or provided a serial number that CAN BE, not SHALL BE registered (no. 2) and it DOES NOT state who issues the serial number.

Again...poorly written laws. Words have meaning.
5
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 14, 2020, 09:53:30 AM »
I can see people traveling to the mainland and coming back to Hawaii with a few "souvenirs" they bought legally without serial numbers.  Since they are legal federally, the TSA would have no reason to see them as contraband leaving the state where they were purchased.

As usual, this is another unenforceable law unless (1) someone turns you in, or (2) you happen to be subject to a search warrant for something else, and the Cops discover the "paper weights".

I wonder, if you add a serial number to the blanks you're storing but don't get them registered, they can't get you on ghost gun charges, right?  Just a misdemeanor for an unregistered non-firearm.

Would be an interesting court battle. Argument would be, it is not a firearm as defined.. When they go bu, bu, but the law says this, whip out the piece of 16 GA steel and say that's a firearm too by the states definition. Or the piece of pipe or the shovel... Unless it has been manufactured as a firearm, it isn't. Is airsoft stuff, what about BB guns? Both of those use air or spring power to propel a projectile. A piece of plastic without the ability to "shoot" anything is not a firearm.

You're either pregnant or you aren't.
6
General Discussion / Re: Ghost gun bill passes
« on: September 11, 2020, 05:13:20 PM »
Another interpretation can be that you can still purchase them freely at any gun store or via the internet. The key to all of this is sentence 2:

"§134-    Manufacturing, purchasing, or obtaining firearm parts to assemble a firearm having no serial number; penalty.  (a)  A person who is not licensed to manufacture a firearm under section 134-31, or who is not a dealer licensed by the United States Department of Justice, shall not, for the purpose of assembling a firearm, purchase, produce with a three-dimensional printer, or otherwise obtain separately, or as part of a kit:

     (1)  A firearm receiver that is not imprinted with a serial number registered with a federally licensed manufacturer;

    (2)  A firearm receiver that has not been provided a serial number that may be registered in accordance with section 134-3(c); or

     (3)  Any combination of parts from which a firearm having no serial number may be readily assembled; provided that the parts do not have the capacity to function as a firearm unless assembled."

...meaning, if you put a serial number on the piece of plastic/metal FIRST before you begin any milling or drilling, you are in compliance with the law as written.

And while they have attempted to define a firearm receiver..."Firearm receiver" includes any object or part that is not a firearm frame or receiver in finished form but that is designed or intended to be used for that purpose and may readily be made into a firearm frame or receiver through milling or other means." they have never defined the term readily. And that has been asked for eons and as for intent, if I go into Home Depot and purchase a 10x12 piece of 12 gauge sheet metal with the INTENT to make an AK rifle out of it, can HD sell it to me? A piece of steel tube to make a STEN. They aren't an FFL , but are selling firearm parts.

Poorly written laws have unintended consequences
7
Political Discussion / Re: Big Braddah
« on: August 31, 2020, 12:29:14 PM »
fuck them
8
Attorney General Becerra Continues Defense of California’s Ban on Acquisition and Possession of Large-Capacity Magazines
https://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/attorney-general-becerra-continues-defense-california%E2%80%99s-ban-acquisition-and

Friday, August 28, 2020
Contact: (916) 210-6000, agpressoffice@doj.ca.gov
Petition filed in appellate court to rehear decision in Duncan v. Becerra

SACRAMENTO – California Attorney General Xavier Becerra today filed a petition in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit seeking en banc review of a recent decision in Duncan v. Becerra. On August 14, 2020, a divided three-judge panel upheld a federal district court’s ruling that California’s ban on the acquisition and possession of large-capacity magazines (LCMs) was unconstitutional. In today’s filing, Attorney General Becerra has taken the next step to defend California’s gun safety laws by asking an en banc panel of the court to review the decision.

“Our commonsense gun safety measures here in California have a track record of success in doing what they were meant to do — keep our communities safe,” said Attorney General Becerra. “We disagree with the Court’s initial decision and will continue to use every tool we have to defend the constitutionality of our laws.”

In today’s filing, Attorney General Becerra argues that the three-judge panel’s decision is inconsistent with existing caselaw and will threaten the safety of Californians.

Large-capacity magazines are defined as gun magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition. It has been illegal in California to manufacture, import, keep or offer for sale, give, or lend LCMs since 2000, and illegal to purchase and receive them since 2013. Proposition 63, which was passed by Californians in 2016, added a ban on the possession of LCMs. In March 2019, the District Court for the Southern District of California ruled that the law was unconstitutional. In July 2019, Attorney General Becerra appealed the decision. 

LCMs have been used in many horrific mass shootings around the country, including the shooting at the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks in 2018, and the shooting at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino in 2015. The use of large-capacity magazines in mass shootings results in more lives lost and more people injured. Attorney General Becerra remains committed to upholding the constitutionality of California’s restrictions on large-capacity magazines to protect the public from these dangerous firearm accessories.

The ban on the sale, purchase, manufacture, importation, or acquisition of LCMs remains in effect pending appeal.

A copy of the filing can be found here. https://oag.ca.gov/system/files/attachments/press-docs/Duncan%20v.%20Becerra%20-%20Petition%20for%20Rehearing%20En%20Banc%20FINAL%20FILED%20VERSION.pdf

9
General Discussion / Re: Honolulu PD permit/reg. by appointment only
« on: August 27, 2020, 01:38:23 PM »
So how many windows do they have operating down there usually? I still can't figure out how they used to process everyone pre-COVID but now every single appointment is booked past 90 days.

I did more number crunching and here is what they were doing pre-COVID
PERMIT APPLICATION AVERAGES               
            yearly   monthly   weekly   daily  Hourly (8 hour day)
Historical   13329   1111           256           37          4.6
10 Year   18394   1533   354           50          6.3
5 Year   18354   1530   353           50           6.3
10
Off Topic / Re: The "Old Guy" said goodbye
« on: August 25, 2020, 08:07:08 PM »
A hui ho

To freedom

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11
General Discussion / Re: New stay at home order
« on: August 25, 2020, 08:03:28 PM »
They'll be open. Already stated in previous orders that firearms are essential. Even if HPD does everything in its power to keep us from it.

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12
General Discussion / Re: When are we going to March to City Hall?
« on: August 25, 2020, 08:02:17 PM »
Flapp good comments

Yes I just renewed my membership again with Hifico. So trying to do my little part

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13
Legal and Activism / Re: Young v. Hawaii en banc
« on: August 24, 2020, 10:07:24 PM »
The wheels of justice move slowly, and in our case, backwards.
.....backwards......

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14
Just got off the phone with HPD and they stated that any changes to an appointment like swapping? Both parties need to be on site to verify the appointment swap. So even if you agree with another party here on 2A both individuals need to still make it to the station to do any swapping of times for permits or registration.

This shit is F’d up!
One... I don't believe anything they say. They make up their own rules as they go. I need go no further than how they measure barrels or try to make people weld magazines to lowers for AR pistols even though there is no such rule.

Their only goal is to make things more difficult for us.

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15
General Discussion / Re: Honolulu PD permit/reg. by appointment only
« on: August 24, 2020, 07:49:47 PM »
We gotta end this crazy! How is it that they had plenty of time to do walkups precovid but now no can get appointments?

Time to go back to writing every legislator and such to get them to fix this problem.

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16
Damn I guess we gotta be posting when we swap

Was in the middle of swap and someone swooped it.



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17
General Discussion / Re: Kydex
« on: August 21, 2020, 08:07:51 AM »
Thanks guys..Looking for a local shop that carries these types of things before ordering online...Just looking for some pieces to modify a knife sheath that I have. Don't like how the sheath sits on my belt

I read that too fast....   ;)
19
Legal and Activism / Hawaii Magazine Ban ends - we hope
« on: August 20, 2020, 01:48:29 PM »
From HiFiCo Facebook page....

Over the last week we have been asked A LOT about Duncan v. Becerra and how does it affect Hawaii's law. We have been pretty quiet about it and provided very little feedback.

HERE'S WHY;
Honolulu, Hawaii. August 20th, 2020. Yesterday evening Attorney Alan Beck on behalf of Hawaii Firearms Coalition director Jon Abbott and two other Hawaii residents (Kevin Kacatin and Soleil Roache), filed a lawsuit in the US District Court of Hawaii.

The lawsuit alleges that Hawaii's ban on Handgun magazines with a capacity greater than ten rounds in unconstitutional. HRS 134-8(c) bans the possession of any magazines capable of holding more than ten rounds. The plaintiffs in the case have all stated that if it were not for Hawaii's ban, they would seek to and would own magazines with a larger capacity. Currently, if they were to be found in possession and using said magazines, they would be charged with a Class C felony.

The recent ruling by the 9th Circuit Court in Duncan v. Becerra supports this lawsuit. In that case, the court found that; millions of ammunition magazines able to hold more than 10 rounds are in common use by law-abiding responsible citizens for lawful uses like self-defense. As such, they are protected by the second amendment and can not be subject to a categorical ban.

Applying the same logical steps used by the 9th Circuit Court in Duncan, Hawaii's law is likely to be found unconstitutional. In recent years Hawaii's Firearms Coalition has asked legislators to amend Hawaii's law to remove the capacity based ban, but legislators have been unwilling to do so. The only available course of action left is to have it removed by the courts.

Hawaii Firearms Coalition is a non-profit based in the state of Hawaii that focuses on the second amendment and the right to bear arms. For more information and membership opportunities, please visit www.hifico.org


https://www.facebook.com/hificoorg/posts/897796730708223

https://www.facebook.com/hificoorg/photos/a.422936111527623/897931580694738/



20
The data is now a couple days old but the math still works

1416000 POPULATION OF HAWAII

5192 POSITIVE COVID CASES IN HAWAII

39 COVID RELATED DEATHS

0.367% % OF COVID CASES/POPULATION

0.751% % OF COVID DEATHS/CASES

0.00275% % OF COVID DEATHS/POPULATION

So in the State of Hawaii, less that 0.5% of the population has contracted it. Of those contracting it, less than 1% have died (and I don't want anyone dying). AND less than 3 Hundredths of a percent have died in relation to the population of the state. So yes by all means, lets cripple the states economy and crush everyone living in Hawaii.
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