Hurricane Season 2018 (Read 10657 times)

RSN172

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #140 on: August 26, 2018, 09:21:09 AM »
This Sunday morning news said City Mill is not accepting returns on bottled water or generators that had gas put in it.

2ahavvaii

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #141 on: August 26, 2018, 12:43:42 PM »
This Sunday morning news said City Mill is not accepting returns on bottled water or generators that had gas put in it.

good on both accounts.

This is just my opinion, but there are certain steps in hurricane preparedness that you should only take when a strike is imminent unless you have no choice but to prepare ahead.  it can be very inconvenient otherwise.

Filling a generator with gasoline is one, also boarding up ones windows, filling bathtubs and 5 gallon buckets with water are others.

Also, as far as generators go, I think butane/propane generators are the better option over gasoline.  It's safer and easier to store long term. 

2ahavvaii

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #142 on: August 26, 2018, 12:55:24 PM »
What "opportunity to see how prepared (H)awaii is in the event of a large scale natural disaster." do you speak of ?
There was no natural disaster , much less a "large scale natural disaster"
Granted BI got lots of water (no offense) but Oahu and other islands had no real flooding, power outages, wind etc...  :sleeping:  :sleeping:
Hardly what I would consider a test in state readiness.

Read my post again please.  I'ts not that hard to figure out.  Buildings have fire drills to prepare occupants and management for a building fire.  Does the building actually need to burn to the ground first to determine readiness for a building fire?

I think you're confused between readiness and response (post event), which is what you're talking about.  I personally believe that the resources allocated towards responding after a major hurricane hits in hawaii is insufficient (thank our lawmakers for that), but that's a topic for another day.

drck1000

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #143 on: August 26, 2018, 01:11:10 PM »
I was pretty impressed with many preparations for response post event that I noticed or heard about. One was the staging of vehicles and equipment in the H3 tunnel and appearing to be ready to go. Another was the preparations and coordination of the National guard and support from “Title 10” elements.

I’m now more concerned that folks will take future events lightly considering this near miss where nothing much happened for most of Oahu.

While this wasn’t a test of disaster response, I think many learned about their preps and individual situations.

newguy86

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #144 on: August 26, 2018, 02:09:21 PM »
After doin a 12 hour volunteer at one of the shelters here, i have to say hawaii is not ready for a hurricane, nothing was in place for any aftermath if we was to be hit, really sad,i under stand ppl need to bring their supply, but i seen kids and pregnant women sleeping on the floor,  they should have laid down the gym mattes, alot of listened learn here, big eye opener for me

2ahavvaii

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #145 on: August 26, 2018, 02:16:51 PM »
After doin a 12 hour volunteer at one of the shelters here, i have to say hawaii is not ready for a hurricane, nothing was in place for any aftermath if we was to be hit, really sad,i under stand ppl need to bring their supply, but i seen kids and pregnant women sleeping on the floor,  they should have laid down the gym mattes, alot of listened learn here, big eye opener for me

It actually would be nice if the shelters were stocked with food/water and that they were comfortable.  But the point of the shelters is emergency shelter, and emergency shelter alone.  The intent of the shelter is to provide a safer place to keep you alive while the storm passes.  The state makes this clear.  If you want a matress or futon to sleep on, you need to bring it yourself.The state does not have the resources allocated to do what you're suggesting. 

In the future, if there's funding allocated towards it, the state could keep supplies stationed at every major shelter (schools) for post hurricane relief efforts.  It would help relieve immediately after the storm, as the people most likely to use the shelters tend to be poorer or homeless.



I was pretty impressed with many preparations for response post event that I noticed or heard about. One was the staging of vehicles and equipment in the H3 tunnel and appearing to be ready to go. Another was the preparations and coordination of the National guard and support from “Title 10” elements.

I’m now more concerned that folks will take future events lightly considering this near miss where nothing much happened for most of Oahu.

While this wasn’t a test of disaster response, I think many learned about their preps and individual situations.

One thing I've found encouraging  is that nowadays, after major disasters or disaster misses like this one, planners are looking at what went wrong, and try ti incorporate fixes in procedure for the future.  Hawaii itself has not gotten hit by a major hurricane since iniki, but they're using lessons learned from puerto rico and other hurricanes to better hawaii's preparedness.  The strategy of staging of equipment closer to anticipated need and ready to go and closer coordination between agencies has come about as a result of hard lessons learned from other hurricanes that hit the east coast. 

Without coordination, you can have a lot of fucked up things happening... like if a critical road to the airport needed to be cleared, you have county, state, and national guard personnel showing up on site, but noone thought to bring the dozer because they thought the other party was going to take care of it.  Or you get 5 backhoes sent to the location, but no way to keep them fueled.  The fuel trucks are still sitting in a yard still blocked by debris across the island.

The reason they implemented the 2 weeks of food, water, and supplies last year was in direct response from experiences form other states that have gone through similar disasters.  The better supplied residents are, the more disaster workers can focus on restoring critical infrastructure; restoring the ports, airports, main roads, and power, instead of worrying how to keep people from starving and dying of dehydration immediately after the storm hits.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 02:38:52 PM by 2ahavvaii »

drck1000

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #146 on: August 26, 2018, 02:51:09 PM »
One thing I've found encouraging  is that nowadays, after major disasters or disaster misses like this one, planners are looking at what went wrong, and try ti incorporate fixes in procedure for the future.  Hawaii itself has not gotten hit by a major hurricane since iniki, but they're using lessons learned from puerto rico and other hurricanes to better hawaii's preparedness.  The strategy of staging of equipment closer to anticipated need and ready to go and closer coordination between agencies has come about as a result of hard lessons learned from other hurricanes that hit the east coast. 

Without coordination, you can have a lot of fucked up things happening... like if a critical road to the airport needed to be cleared, you have county, state, and national guard personnel showing up on site, but noone thought to bring the dozer because they thought the other party was going to take care of it.  Or you get 5 backhoes sent to the location, but no way to keep them fueled.  The fuel trucks are still sitting in a yard still blocked by debris across the island.

The reason they implemented the 2 weeks of food, water, and supplies last year was in direct response from experiences form other states that have gone through similar disasters.  The better supplied residents are, the more disaster workers can focus on restoring critical infrastructure; restoring the ports, airports, main roads, and power, instead of worrying how to keep people from starving and dying of dehydration immediately after the storm hits.

Yeah, lots of lessons learned, especially after big storms and earthquakes. I’m on a team that does damage assessments post events and it’s amazing the amount of data collected and efforts put forth to try to prevent or at least minimize effects of future events. Dealing with Mother Nature is unpredictable and can never fully prevent some things, but we can definitely help minimize suffering and try to maximize recovery.

RSN172

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #147 on: August 26, 2018, 03:13:14 PM »
I could never see buying water.  When I lived on Oahu and there was a pending disaster, I would fill trash cans with water for flushing the toilet.  I would always have at least 20 plastic gallon containers on hand to fill for cooking and drinking water.  I would go and buy beer.  Never needed to rush out and buy toilet paper either.  We always have at least a 6 week supply on hand. 

macsak

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #148 on: August 26, 2018, 03:19:01 PM »
This Sunday morning news said City Mill is not accepting returns on bottled water or generators that had gas put in it.

I heard Costco HK was not that crowded an hour ago
not much line in the returns, but there was a bunch of water that had already been returned

drck1000

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #149 on: August 26, 2018, 09:08:28 PM »
I could never see buying water.  When I lived on Oahu and there was a pending disaster, I would fill trash cans with water for flushing the toilet.  I would always have at least 20 plastic gallon containers on hand to fill for cooking and drinking water.  I would go and buy beer.  Never needed to rush out and buy toilet paper either.  We always have at least a 6 week supply on hand.
I usually have bottled water on hand for guests as well as various activities that need bottled water. So I rotate my stock pretty regularly. I also have a bunch of larger bottles of water that I’ve saved and I’ll fill those and leave on the kitchen counter. I also fill the smaller coolers and buckets that I have around for flushing toilets.   

Beer was one thing I didn’t have. Plenty of other alcohol though.  >:(

Inspector

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #150 on: August 27, 2018, 05:46:08 AM »
I usually have bottled water on hand for guests as well as various activities that need bottled water. So I rotate my stock pretty regularly. I also have a bunch of larger bottles of water that I’ve saved and I’ll fill those and leave on the kitchen counter. I also fill the smaller coolers and buckets that I have around for flushing toilets.   

Beer was one thing I didn’t have. Plenty of other alcohol though.  >:(
I always have bottled water due to my having to bring my own out to the job sites I visit. By law, the GC is required to provide water and drinking cups but as I am sure you know this is not a priority for some GC’s. So out of self defense I have to bring my own. So I am constantly rotating my stores of water. I go through a lot considering I am just one person. I also recycle every bottle I buy.

2ahavvaii

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #151 on: August 27, 2018, 08:46:32 AM »
I always have bottled water due to my having to bring my own out to the job sites I visit. By law, the GC is required to provide water and drinking cups but as I am sure you know this is not a priority for some GC’s. So out of self defense I have to bring my own. So I am constantly rotating my stores of water. I go through a lot considering I am just one person. I also recycle every bottle I buy.

I normally use a 40oz hydroflask thingie for work daily, and don't bother cycling my emergency water.  As long as the seals aren't broken, the water is safe to drink (as is canned food for that matter). 

Water is one of the things that you'd have to be an idiot to be unable to prepare for.  Bottle water is convenient, but you can pretty much fill any clean container with water for emergency usage.  If you're looking at water for flushing toilets or whatever, you can just fill those stupid c&c bins...Not sure how many gallons that is, just that it's A LOT of water. Worst comes to worst, you can just plug your bathtub drain and fill that with water.   

Inspector

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #152 on: August 27, 2018, 09:27:44 AM »
I normally use a 40oz hydroflask thingie for work daily, and don't bother cycling my emergency water.  As long as the seals aren't broken, the water is safe to drink (as is canned food for that matter). 

Water is one of the things that you'd have to be an idiot to be unable to prepare for.  Bottle water is convenient, but you can pretty much fill any clean container with water for emergency usage.  If you're looking at water for flushing toilets or whatever, you can just fill those stupid c&c bins...Not sure how many gallons that is, just that it's A LOT of water. Worst comes to worst, you can just plug your bathtub drain and fill that with water.
I use the bottle water for convenience. It fits in my back pocket and is not something extra I  have to carry up and down stairs and ladders.   I usually cycle thru 4 cases of water due to this. Including flavored water I usually have 6 or so cases of water on hand at any time. More than enough for the wife and I in an emergency.

I am currently emptying my green container now that it is no longer needed. It takes a lot of 5gallon buckets  to empty it. I am letting it drain out using my hose. I also drained my bathtub this morning.

drck1000

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #153 on: August 27, 2018, 09:40:01 AM »
I have a 64oz Hydro Flask. I used to have a 40 oz one, but a buddy got the larger growler for a present so I use it now. A lot of it is filled with ice though. When I used to workout more often after work, sometimes I would drink all the water in the office and have to fill up before going to workout. Sometimes I would empty the bottle twice.

Lihikai

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #154 on: August 27, 2018, 10:18:45 AM »
Wow, you must be part camel.

drck1000

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #155 on: August 27, 2018, 10:24:01 AM »
Wow, you must be part camel.
Haha. Nah. Prob drink half that volume for every fill since so much ice. But when I used to do Krav and boxing after work, those workouts made you sweat.. a LOT!

stangzilla

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #156 on: August 27, 2018, 01:23:51 PM »
I learned that some of my family ain't prepared for crap!
they will depend on my prepping for their plan B when their food and water run out in 1-2 days.  couple family members literally had food and water to only last a couple days.
if and when SHTF, they better have something good to trade me or they ain't getting nothing from me 

they laughed at the original doomsday prepper for preparing for a catastrophic flood, until it rained for 40 days and 40 nights...

Rocky

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #157 on: August 28, 2018, 06:33:32 AM »
Read my post again please.  I'ts not that hard to figure out.  Buildings have fire drills to prepare occupants and management for a building fire.  Does the building actually need to burn to the ground first to determine readiness for a building fire?

I think you're confused between readiness and response (post event), which is what you're talking about.  I personally believe that the resources allocated towards responding after a major hurricane hits in hawaii is insufficient (thank our lawmakers for that), but that's a topic for another day.

   Read my post again please.  It's also not that hard to figure out.

What "opportunity to see how prepared (H)awaii is in the event of a large scale natural disaster." do you speak of ?

   What "better cooperation and communication between the state, feds, national guard, all counties, and private companies." are you talking about ?  :wacko:
The only difference I saw was that the HFD drove by Friday morning with PA announcing that we were under a Hurricane Warning (duh), something done once before a long time ago by CD.

   Perhaps you are in a position to enlighten us on info we or at least  I am not privy to.
Are you saying they kept the power on by not letting utility poles fall down because of minimal winds ?
They stopped flooding on the islands (excluding BI) because of the lack of rainfall ?
As the BI took the brunt of the storms rainfall, what are these "state, feds, national guard, all counties, and private companies." doing to help them ?

    Again, because there was no natural disaster, much less a "large scale natural disaster" I don't see how their preparations were tested.
Hardly what I [/b IMHO ]would consider a test in state readiness.

    On the other hand, it may have been a great test for the common public to see how UNPREPARED they were, but seeing how the storm bypassed the majority of the state, it will just  be another feather in the hat of complacency.  :-\
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

Drakiir84

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #158 on: August 29, 2018, 08:04:58 AM »
If your water came from the tap and is safe to drink, you really don't need to boil it.  Hopefully the city already makes the water drinkable when you turn on the faucet.  :shake:

If you use a filter (Brita, fridge water dispenser, etc.), you'll eliminate chlorine and other chemicals or particulates to make the water better tasting, but those chemicals keep the water safe by killing bacteria.

I'd recommend going straight from the tap to the freezer.  Boiling seems redundant.

Yup, only reason to boil from the tap is if the water supply was compromised due to the disaster, and the Board of Water supply would inform us if that were the case.  Remember that your water heater is a great source of emergency water and if you don't have one, get one of these WaterBOBs if you have a tub.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B001AXLUX2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
"The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no mistake about that. It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of its user. It is equally useful in securing meat for the table, destroying group enemies on the battlefield, and resisting tyranny. In fact, it is the only means of resisting tyranny, since a citizenry armed with rifles simply cannot be tyrannized."
-Jeff Cooper

stangzilla

Re: Hurricane Season 2018
« Reply #159 on: August 29, 2018, 08:25:20 AM »
I have a water bob.  great for disaster prep.  holds up to 100 gallons.   :thumbsup:


I also have a brita pitcher and spare filters.  after doing many plumbing jobs around the house and seeing the inside of the pipes, I will always filter the water.  the inside of the pipes are disgusting!  theres rust, brown crap.  I can just imagine what the inside of the main water pipes look like. water may be safe to drink, but I'd rather filter out all the crap that gets stuck in the pipes.