Firearms Training - Sharing Experience (Read 25826 times)

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #100 on: December 03, 2019, 03:43:27 PM »
Is there a link to the rules?  Sounds like something I wanna try at least once.  But I will be shooting factory range ammo, and not that soft on the hands stuff.

https://www.ipsc.org/pdf/RulesHandgun.pdf

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #101 on: December 03, 2019, 04:09:49 PM »
Is there a link to the rules?  Sounds like something I wanna try at least once.  But I will be shooting factory range ammo, and not that soft on the hands stuff.
Macsak already posted the rules.  Having shot with HDF, I'm sure you have all of the necessary gear for USPSA/IPSC.  As long as you're mindful of the safety rules, think you'll be fine. 

I only shoot factory 115 gr 9 mm.  None of that "poofter" stuff for me.  Not that I thumb my nose at it, but I really don't own any reloading equipment or components, so I shoot whatever bulk ammo I can get at a good price.   

During the match this weekend, there were some shooting production division that the ammo sounded REALLY soft.   

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #102 on: December 30, 2019, 03:57:43 PM »
As mentioned in the handgun red dot thread, had a short training session this past weekend.  While I have been spending a lot more time shooting lately, I haven't been doing much holster work.  I definitely feel that my draw and time to first shot has gotten a LOT slower.  Could that have been because of picking up the red dot?  Maybe in some cases, but there were times when I had the dot but I had rushed the draw and didn't get a solid grip and net result suffered at times. 

Another aspect I have been working on is cutting down transition time.  Speeding up the process starting with the last shot on target A and then transition to target B.  Got to work on that a little bit this past weekend, but something I definitely want to work on a lot more. 

Some notes:
1) My new 19 based setup came with Magpul mags.  They fed flawlessly, but I did notice that they were slightly more "sticky" than OEM Glock mags.  Have to be more disciplined with dropping the mag with the gun at more vertical angle.  My tendency is to get quick to the reload position and mag isn't being released until after the gun is already tilted. 

2) I am NOT a fan of the ETS mags.  It seems like the rounds bind up on either the sides of the mag or at the feed lips.  Luckily I don't bought one of them.  I may give the another try or two, but with the pricing of the Magpul mags, no reason to spend the asking price for the ETS mags. 

3) Don't be afraid to push things in training.  I'm not saying go all out and get sloppy and wreckless, but be ok with seeing where you're failing and embrace those as things to work on.  Had a couple of shooters getting down on themselves a bit when the targets weren't as clean as they would've liked, hits on steel not as consistent, etc.  I definitely did notice that at times in my shooting.  Rust was definitely a factor in many cases and I can say a little bit for me as well, but I noted those aspects as things to work on.  Back to a lot more ball & dummy for me. 

Had a bunch of newer shooters during the open shoot session.  Good to have more likely minded folks who are very interested in shooting and responsible gun ownership.  Even better to have those who are enthusiastic about sharing their firearms and their experiences with those new to shooting.

Overall a great day of shooting.  Reminders that shooting is a perishable skill, but I am looking forward to working on that. 
« Last Edit: January 07, 2020, 01:38:35 PM by drck1000 »

Inspector

  • Trade Count: (+19)
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8502
  • Total likes: 1101
  • Everything Around a Pigs Ass is Pork
  • Referrals: 6
    • View Profile
Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #103 on: December 30, 2019, 07:24:04 PM »
I don’t normally attend training classes. I learned the hard way, especially when I picked up a poor grip or stance and made it a habit. Still not great, but better than I used to be. Slick at the range gave me some terrific pointers that helped me become a better revolver shooter.

So when I decided to carry a DA only revolver I decided I needed to learn to shoot a DA revolver better and faster. This includes draw but I am having a hard time deciding on the proper holster for myself. I think I am going to have to try 2 or 3 different types to figure out which type I prefer. Anyway, I bought an old out of print book written by an old LEO back in the 60’s. The whole book is on how to shoot DAO Revolvers quickly and in numerous situations. I learned a lot from that book. But when it came to practice I sucked a lot!!! All of my old habits that are proper for slow fire target shooting SA no longer apply. I practiced so much at one point I got a blister on my trigger finger. In all the years I have been shooting I have never had that happen before. I think I am coming along okay. I painted my front sight white so I can pick it up easier. And it will be nice to be able to practice at 7-15 yds over the 25 we have here.

My first big project after I get my reloading set back up is to settle on SD ammo (Like Gold Dots) for my gun and then reload similarly for practice ammo.
Officially Retired and living in the free state of Arizona.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #104 on: December 30, 2019, 09:16:20 PM »
I don’t normally attend training classes. I learned the hard way, especially when I picked up a poor grip or stance and made it a habit. Still not great, but better than I used to be. Slick at the range gave me some terrific pointers that helped me become a better revolver shooter.

So when I decided to carry a DA only revolver I decided I needed to learn to shoot a DA revolver better and faster. This includes draw but I am having a hard time deciding on the proper holster for myself. I think I am going to have to try 2 or 3 different types to figure out which type I prefer. Anyway, I bought an old out of print book written by an old LEO back in the 60’s. The whole book is on how to shoot DAO Revolvers quickly and in numerous situations. I learned a lot from that book. But when it came to practice I sucked a lot!!! All of my old habits that are proper for slow fire target shooting SA no longer apply. I practiced so much at one point I got a blister on my trigger finger. In all the years I have been shooting I have never had that happen before. I think I am coming along okay. I painted my front sight white so I can pick it up easier. And it will be nice to be able to practice at 7-15 yds over the 25 we have here.

My first big project after I get my reloading set back up is to settle on SD ammo (Like Gold Dots) for my gun and then reload similarly for practice ammo.
DA trigger, both revolver and DA/SA handguns is something that is challenging.  I was planning on shooting a couple of matches with my CZ SP-01 where the first shot has to be DA (  ::) ) so I was doing a bunch of dry fire with the DA.  I suspect my first couple of stages will suffer on the first shots out of the holster.   :(

A cop friend on the mainland actually tried to qualify with a revolver.  He's a Glock guy, but also has diverse gun tastes, so he tried mostly for fun.  He said the repetitive long DA pulls is something that he had trouble with when being used to semi-autos with reset. 

Inspector

  • Trade Count: (+19)
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8502
  • Total likes: 1101
  • Everything Around a Pigs Ass is Pork
  • Referrals: 6
    • View Profile
Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #105 on: December 31, 2019, 06:28:55 AM »
DA trigger, both revolver and DA/SA handguns is something that is challenging.  I was planning on shooting a couple of matches with my CZ SP-01 where the first shot has to be DA (  ::) ) so I was doing a bunch of dry fire with the DA.  I suspect my first couple of stages will suffer on the first shots out of the holster.   :(

A cop friend on the mainland actually tried to qualify with a revolver.  He's a Glock guy, but also has diverse gun tastes, so he tried mostly for fun.  He said the repetitive long DA pulls is something that he had trouble with when being used to semi-autos with reset.
I have a Sig P-228. It is basically an older version of the current P-229. For many years that was what I designated as my carry gun if I ever lived somewhere that I could carry. I had a hard time transitioning from DA to SA and doing it smoothly. I have not shot it in a long time. I bought my Glock 17 before that and I practiced with the Glock for many years before I settled back into revolvers. So the Sig has been sidelined. I really need to start training with a holster.
Officially Retired and living in the free state of Arizona.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #106 on: January 01, 2020, 12:33:04 PM »
I have a Sig P-228. It is basically an older version of the current P-229. For many years that was what I designated as my carry gun if I ever lived somewhere that I could carry. I had a hard time transitioning from DA to SA and doing it smoothly. I have not shot it in a long time. I bought my Glock 17 before that and I practiced with the Glock for many years before I settled back into revolvers. So the Sig has been sidelined. I really need to start training with a holster.
One day I’ll get a 228 or 229. Preferably one made in Germany. One of the first guns I shot was a 226 and I enjoyed shooting that gun.

The DA/SA is something I’d have to work a lot at. When I used to shoot with the defensive group at SRGC, many shooters had Sigs. It was common for the first shot out of the holster to be a “dick shot”.  :rofl:

zippz

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #107 on: January 01, 2020, 12:42:18 PM »
One day I’ll get a 228 or 229. Preferably one made in Germany. One of the first guns I shot was a 226 and I enjoyed shooting that gun.

The DA/SA is something I’d have to work a lot at. When I used to shoot with the defensive group at SRGC, many shooters had Sigs. It was common for the first shot out of the holster to be a “dick shot”.  :rofl:

Revolvers and this thing helps a lot with that where you can get double action accuracy almost as good as single action.

Join the Hawaii Firearms Coalition at www.hifico.org.  Hawaii's new non-profit gun rights organization focused on lobbying and grassroots activism.

Hawaii Shooting Calendar - https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=practicalmarksman.com_btllod1boifgpp8dcjnbnruhso%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=Pacific/Honolulu

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #108 on: January 01, 2020, 12:54:13 PM »
One day I’ll get a 228 or 229. Preferably one made in Germany. One of the first guns I shot was a 226 and I enjoyed shooting that gun.

The DA/SA is something I’d have to work a lot at. When I used to shoot with the defensive group at SRGC, many shooters had Sigs. It was common for the first shot out of the holster to be a “dick shot”.  :rofl:

heads

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #109 on: January 06, 2020, 12:47:36 PM »
Shot a pistol match over the weekend.  Had been spending a good amount of time working on some things recently, so I was looking forward to seeing that effort pay off.  Well, it did and didn't  :( :facepalm: 

Some notes:
1) Made a rookie mistake, which I've actually done before, by shooting a match (or training shoot) with new gear.  I had all new factory mags for this match.  Well, I did use two of them in a range session a couple of days before and didn't have any malfunctions.  However, on the first stage, a malfunction messed up what was otherwise a pretty good and clean run.  Hits were mostly good, but the time to clear the malfunction is what cost me on that stage.  The malfunction also messed up the plan for the stage.  After watching the video, I noticed that my reloads and sequence seemed thrown off after the malfunction.  It happens and I should be better at recovering from stuff like that.  Noticed that "first fumble" also messed up a number of other shooters, especially on the first stage of the day.  Again, something that I should be better at working through.  At least looking back at the malfunction clearance, I caught it quickly and cleared it quickly.  Just that time cost me. . .  I also noticed old habits crept back in after that "first fumble".  Something I'll have to work on (among many other things).

2) Target transitions was something I had been working on also recently.  Both dry practice and in a couple of sessions at the range and in the action bays.  It was something that a couple of stages presented opportunities to see my progress.  First one wasn't great as I think I was focused on the low percentage first shot, fumbled the mandatory reload and threw things off on everything that followed.  Since I fumbled, I think I rushed the transition between target 2 and target 3 and I think I threw the second shot on target 2 in the rush to get to target 3.  Looking back at the video, my transition seemed good.  I think I was just in a rush to make up the time that I didn't "finish" well on target 2.  That was actually something I saw happen with number of experienced shooters.  They were in a rush to transition and threw the second shot of the target before transitioning to the next target.  Anyways, nothing new and just a matter of mind focusing on task 8-9-10 and not taking care of 1-2-3 first.   >:(

3) This was my second match after surgery I had in late 2018.  There are some lingering effects and is/was something that prevented me from shooting matches in pretty much all of 2019.  While I still have to be mindful of that, I didn't really notice that it hindered me in the match this past weekend.  I'm back to enjoying shooting the matches again.  Of course not as mobile or fleet-of-foot as I was 2-3+ years ago, but finding a way to "use what I've got" in an activity that I enjoy is an awesome feeling.  I'm becoming the older guy that shoots well, but slow(er) on the running, more like fast walk, in between shooting positions.  At least in my mind.   ;D  :rofl:

4) Throttle control was awesome at times and really bad at others.  I shot the steel plate rack decently and got the lower percentage smaller steel targets/activator 1/1 (normally a nemesis of mine), so I was happy with the control there.  Where I suffered was in stages 3 and 4 I made a point to shoot the paper faster.  I thought I had throttled back on the lower percentage targets to get the proper hits, but that didn't happen for more than a few times.  Looking back at the video, I did throttle things back on some of the lower percentage targets, but apparently not enough.  I also could have pushed the pace on some of the higher percentage targets.  At the end of one stage, I saw at least one 'mike' and I said out loud "went to fast".  That got a laugh from a couple guys in my squad who heard it and they were like "no such thing!"  :rofl: What I meant was I went too fast on targets that I should've throttled back a little and the hits, or lack thereof was apparent.  I also notice this when I have a couple of good stages and get too cocky on the following stages.  Push the throttle a little too much and hits go down.  I don't mind the hits going down, but not when they turn into 'mikes'. 

5) There were a number of new shooters in the match.  The new shooter in my group was pretty good and good guy to talk to.  He was safe and was having a lot of fun.  That said, there were a few shooters I saw in other squads that needed correction more than a few times and a few DQs  :(  I saw a couple that had some pretty bad habits (mostly trigger finger). 

6) There were a number of malfunctioning guns.  One had a bad extractor that was "tuned" by the owner.  They were not able to correct the issue and that ended that guy's day.  When I was taking a water break, a guy from the squad came over to drink water the same time and he was like "see, that's why some things should only be done by gunsmiths".  I generally don't tinker with my guns much, but in general I agree. 

A fun day on the range with a bunch of like minded and cool guys.  Of course friendly competition and good nature ribbing keeps things fun.  The weather was spotty, but overall was pretty nice all day.  Looking forward to more matches.  Gotta keep an eye out for ammo sales again.   ;D

And I didn't finish last. . .  ;)  ;D  8)  :geekdanc:

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #110 on: January 06, 2020, 08:34:03 PM »
since I own no firearms or ammo, I could only watch
there was one guy that broke the 180
he might have even broke the 215
I swiftly walked behind drck and the 101/newby
also noticed sodie ducking behind me (who says there is no I in Tim?)

Shot a pistol match over the weekend.  Had been spending a good amount of time working on some things recently, so I was looking forward to seeing that effort pay off.  Well, it did and didn't  :( :facepalm: 

Some notes:
1) Made a rookie mistake, which I've actually done before, by shooting a match (or training shoot) with new gear.  I had all new factory mags for this match.  Well, I did use two of them in a range session a couple of days before and didn't have any malfunctions.  However, on the first stage, a malfunction messed up what was otherwise a pretty good and clean run.  Hits were mostly good, but the time to clear the malfunction is what cost me on that stage.  The malfunction also messed up the plan for the stage.  After watching the video, I noticed that my reloads and sequence seemed thrown off after the malfunction.  It happens and I should be better at recovering from stuff like that.  Noticed that "first fumble" also messed up a number of other shooters, especially on the first stage of the day.  Again, something that I should be better at working through.  At least looking back at the malfunction clearance, I caught it quickly and cleared it quickly.  Just that time cost me. . .  I also noticed old habits crept back in after that "first fumble".  Something I'll have to work on (among many other things).

2) Target transitions was something I had been working on also recently.  Both dry practice and in a couple of sessions at the range and in the action bays.  It was something that a couple of stages presented opportunities to see my progress.  First one wasn't great as I think I was focused on the low percentage first shot, fumbled the mandatory reload and threw things off on everything that followed.  Since I fumbled, I think I rushed the transition between target 2 and target 3 and I think I threw the second shot on target 2 in the rush to get to target 3.  Looking back at the video, my transition seemed good.  I think I was just in a rush to make up the time that I didn't "finish" well on target 2.  That was actually something I saw happen with number of experienced shooters.  They were in a rush to transition and threw the second shot of the target before transitioning to the next target.  Anyways, nothing new and just a matter of mind focusing on task 8-9-10 and not taking care of 1-2-3 first.   >:(

3) This was my second match after surgery I had in late 2018.  There are some lingering effects and is/was something that prevented me from shooting matches in pretty much all of 2019.  While I still have to be mindful of that, I didn't really notice that it hindered me in the match this past weekend.  I'm back to enjoying shooting the matches again.  Of course not as mobile or fleet-of-foot as I was 2-3+ years ago, but finding a way to "use what I've got" in an activity that I enjoy is an awesome feeling.  I'm becoming the older guy that shoots well, but slow(er) on the running, more like fast walk, in between shooting positions.  At least in my mind.   ;D  :rofl:

4) Throttle control was awesome at times and really bad at others.  I shot the steel plate rack decently and got the lower percentage smaller steel targets/activator 1/1 (normally a nemesis of mine), so I was happy with the control there.  Where I suffered was in stages 3 and 4 I made a point to shoot the paper faster.  I thought I had throttled back on the lower percentage targets to get the proper hits, but that didn't happen for more than a few times.  Looking back at the video, I did throttle things back on some of the lower percentage targets, but apparently not enough.  I also could have pushed the pace on some of the higher percentage targets.  At the end of one stage, I saw at least one 'mike' and I said out loud "went to fast".  That got a laugh from a couple guys in my squad who heard it and they were like "no such thing!"  :rofl: What I meant was I went too fast on targets that I should've throttled back a little and the hits, or lack thereof was apparent.  I also notice this when I have a couple of good stages and get too cocky on the following stages.  Push the throttle a little too much and hits go down.  I don't mind the hits going down, but not when they turn into 'mikes'. 

5) There were a number of new shooters in the match.  The new shooter in my group was pretty good and good guy to talk to.  He was safe and was having a lot of fun.  That said, there were a few shooters I saw in other squads that needed correction more than a few times and a few DQs  :(  I saw a couple that had some pretty bad habits (mostly trigger finger). 

6) There were a number of malfunctioning guns.  One had a bad extractor that was "tuned" by the owner.  They were not able to correct the issue and that ended that guy's day.  When I was taking a water break, a guy from the squad came over to drink water the same time and he was like "see, that's why some things should only be done by gunsmiths".  I generally don't tinker with my guns much, but in general I agree. 

A fun day on the range with a bunch of like minded and cool guys.  Of course friendly competition and good nature ribbing keeps things fun.  The weather was spotty, but overall was pretty nice all day.  Looking forward to more matches.  Gotta keep an eye out for ammo sales again.   ;D

And I didn't finish last. . .  ;)  ;D  8)  :geekdanc:

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #111 on: January 06, 2020, 10:01:50 PM »
Only 1 guy was there just to watch because he owns no firearms, ammo, reloading equipment, body armor, and comms.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #112 on: January 07, 2020, 10:30:35 AM »
since I own no firearms or ammo, I could only watch
there was one guy that broke the 180
he might have even broke the 215
I swiftly walked behind drck and the 101/newby
also noticed sodie ducking behind me (who says there is no I in Tim?)
When we were on stage 3, I was watching the shooter on stage 4.  He picked up the gun, racked the slide when the gun was still horizontal at about waist level and them BAM right away.  He then raised the gun to get his two handed shooting grip and took another two shots.  I saw that and was like "Whoa!".  "Sodie" was in between where I was sitting and the shooter, but he was relaxing comfortably in his chair and on his phone.  My "whoa!" startled him and he looked at me and was like "what happened?" 

Only 1 guy was there just to watch because he owns no firearms, ammo, reloading equipment, body armor, and comms.

Sounds like 1 boring guy. . .  :rofl:

But seriously, the matches are fun and very newbie friendly.  Muzzle and trigger discipline are of course critical.  Beyond that, enjoy the challenge of shooting competition.  Yeah, there are some that take it quite seriously.  While I would say I am competitive and want to do well, I'm mostly there to have fun and enjoy shooting. 

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #113 on: January 07, 2020, 11:19:32 AM »
When we were on stage 3, I was watching the shooter on stage 4.  He picked up the gun, racked the slide when the gun was still horizontal at about waist level and them BAM right away.  He then raised the gun to get his two handed shooting grip and took another two shots.  I saw that and was like "Whoa!".  "Sodie" was in between where I was sitting and the shooter, but he was relaxing comfortably in his chair and on his phone.  My "whoa!" startled him and he looked at me and was like "what happened?" 
Sounds like 1 boring guy. . .  :rofl:

But seriously, the matches are fun and very newbie friendly.  Muzzle and trigger discipline are of course critical.  Beyond that, enjoy the challenge of shooting competition.  Yeah, there are some that take it quite seriously.  While I would say I am competitive and want to do well, I'm mostly there to have fun and enjoy shooting.

was it the same guy that got DQ'd on stage 3?

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #114 on: January 07, 2020, 12:27:22 PM »
was it the same guy that got DQ'd on stage 3?
No. The guy I was talking about had a red shirt. The guy we saw on stage 4 had a white shirt l, at least I think.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #115 on: January 16, 2020, 08:43:29 AM »
Had a training session this past weekend where I was able to shoot both handgun with RDS and carbine.  That included training for myself as well as time dedicated to helping others as well. 

Notes:
1) Have been shooting mostly handgun (both with RDS and iron sights) lately, so was good to shoot carbine again.  I shot a newer setup with a Geissele rail and Aimpoint CompM5.  I had only shot this gun to zero the dot and irons previously.  I've had carbines with Aimpoint T-1 and other "simple" red dots previously.  That said, my current preference for red dot is the EoTech.  I still do very much appreciate Aimpoints, especially the battery life.  Was a little rusty with some drills where holdovers was key, but not too bad.  Tried to push the pace on some of the shot strings and started throwing hits out of the intended target, so had to throttle things back down a bit.  Was good to get a decent amount of rounds through this newer setup as well as test a couple of things.  First was the ammo I was shooting was pretty low powered (crappy ammo) and had some troubles with a mid-length upper that ran fine with 193 and 855.  This was a carbine length upper and it ate up all of that crappy ammo just fine.  Second was testing this rail and rail covers for heat.  I had been shooting carbine courses with gloves where at many times the upper got hot enough where it would have been painful to continue shooting without gloves.  Tried the Centurion rail covers and did some strings of fire enough to get the portion of the rail away from the covers hot enough that it was uncomfortable without gloves and it was fine in the areas with the covers.

2) Spent a bunch of time shooting my Glock 17 with RDS.  I had been doing a bunch of dry fire to both increase the pace of draw as well as picking up the dot.  Also wanted to try a tip to help with picking the dot back up in higher paced strings of fire.  I thought my draws felt quick, but when I watched the video later, it seemed "not so fast or smooth" after a few shot strings.  I had been picking up the pace with the shot strings and employment of the "hand vice" action helped with the picking the dot back up after a shot.  But I think I was "activating" that pressure before full extension and it slowed down the draw in about the last 4-6".  Shared the video with an instructor who I had been interacting with on IG and he picked that up as well.  Did some dry fire last night and consciously holding off the "activation" of the pressure till just about full extension (or at least as far as I typically extend) really helped bring the draw time down. 

3) The Competition Electronic's shot times does NOT like training in the rain.  Was using the shot timer for a number of drills and I noticed that the window was fogging up.  It eventually stopped working and wouldn't shut off.  A friend had a PACT timer and it worked just fine, even through the rain.  The timer was fine after allowing it to dry out though.

4) Used an older gear belt that I hadn't used in quite a while.  It's the 2-layer type belt with velcro inner and outer belt.  I used to use it quite a bit, but had not in the last 2 years or so.  Anyways, since then, I started using Lancer mags more frequently, whereas I used to use primarily USGI mags.  Well, the mags didn't work well with the pouches on this belt.  The Lancer mags have these ribs on the body of the mag that are wider than the section that goes into the magwell.  That difference in thickness caused the mags to bind up pretty good in the pouch.  I will likely keep this belt setup as-is as I don't want to spend more $$$ on pouches, but have to remember that it doesn't work well with the Lancer mags.  Thankfully the Lancer mags work just fine with the belt setup that I had been using regularly. 

Overall a very fun day on the range, even with the wet weather conditions.  It was nice to have a day on the range where things were cooler, rather than super hot and dusty.   ;D

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #116 on: January 16, 2020, 09:11:30 AM »
No. The guy I was talking about had a red shirt. The guy we saw on stage 4 had a white shirt l, at least I think.

I didn't notice the color of his shirt
I was too busy taking cover behind you...

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #117 on: January 20, 2020, 01:06:48 PM »
Shot a match this past weekend.  Have been putting time into improving my handgun shooting the past many weeks and always look forward to seeing if improvement shows in competition.  Overall, it was good, bad, and almost ugly.  One of the main things I have been working on is speeding up in the "lost time areas".  Speeding up the draw, transitions, economy of motion, etc, in addition to good marksmanship fundamentals.  Saw some in what I've been working on, but some other aspects suffered at times.  Sort of like golf when you have good rounds in some parts of your game where a really good round is when you are able to have things clicking in all aspects.  That wasn't me this past weekend. . .

Notes:
1) I did well in the previous match.  I tend to push things more after having a good match result and about half the time, my hits suffer as I push things a bit too far.  That was the case in the first two stages this past weekend.  My times were really good, but my hits suffered.  I noticed that and buckled back down in stage 3, which ended up being my best stage of the day. 

2) Need to get better at "resetting" in the middle of a stage, especially when something goes off plan.  Be it a miss or so on steel changing "the plan".  It's something you see all the time where after someone has a malfunction or something else that throws things off.  I should be better at working through those things, but I felt sort of just off the first two stages.  A part of why I shoot matches is the "practical" aspect of the matches, so need to be better at "working the problem".

3) Watching video after showed that parts of what I have been working on improved, but sadly some things that I am usually solid on suffered.  When training, common recommendation is to have a plan to work on certain things in a training session.  However, can't be at expense of good fundamentals.  Video is great for that as many times you feel like you're doing something where the video shows otherwise. 

Fun day on the range.  Didn't see anything unsafe.  Saw a few shooters have troubles with their guns malfunctioning or ammo problems.  That can make for a frustrating game, but interesting how people react to that.  Some get super frustrated and some just quietly continue on.  Luckily no gun or ammo problems for me this past weekend.  Just the hits weren't going where I wanted.  :P  "A friend" almost beat me too. . .  :(  :rofl:

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #118 on: January 20, 2020, 01:13:40 PM »
Shot a match this past weekend.  Have been putting time into improving my handgun shooting the past many weeks and always look forward to seeing if improvement shows in competition.  Overall, it was good, bad, and almost ugly.  One of the main things I have been working on is speeding up in the "lost time areas".  Speeding up the draw, transitions, economy of motion, etc, in addition to good marksmanship fundamentals.  Saw some in what I've been working on, but some other aspects suffered at times.  Sort of like golf when you have good rounds in some parts of your game where a really good round is when you are able to have things clicking in all aspects.  That wasn't me this past weekend. . .

Notes:
1) I did well in the previous match.  I tend to push things more after having a good match result and about half the time, my hits suffer as I push things a bit too far.  That was the case in the first two stages this past weekend.  My times were really good, but my hits suffered.  I noticed that and buckled back down in stage 3, which ended up being my best stage of the day. 

2) Need to get better at "resetting" in the middle of a stage, especially when something goes off plan.  Be it a miss or so on steel changing "the plan".  It's something you see all the time where after someone has a malfunction or something else that throws things off.  I should be better at working through those things, but I felt sort of just off the first two stages.  A part of why I shoot matches is the "practical" aspect of the matches, so need to be better at "working the problem".

3) Watching video after showed that parts of what I have been working on improved, but sadly some things that I am usually solid on suffered.  When training, common recommendation is to have a plan to work on certain things in a training session.  However, can't be at expense of good fundamentals.  Video is great for that as many times you feel like you're doing something where the video shows otherwise. 

Fun day on the range.  Didn't see anything unsafe.  Saw a few shooters have troubles with their guns malfunctioning or ammo problems.  That can make for a frustrating game, but interesting how people react to that.  Some get super frustrated and some just quietly continue on.  Luckily no gun or ammo problems for me this past weekend.  Just the hits weren't going where I wanted.  :P  "A friend" almost beat me too. . .  :(  :rofl:

no focus

heads

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #119 on: January 20, 2020, 01:36:41 PM »
no focus

heads
Need more springs (instead of amps)