Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One? (Read 1257 times)

Flapp_Jackson

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #40 on: October 17, 2020, 11:47:59 AM »
The two happiest days in life:

1. The day you buy a new boat.

2. The day you sell the boat.
"That's what laws are for...  If the right people don't break 'em, they're of no use whatsoever.""

robtmc

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #41 on: October 17, 2020, 11:48:08 AM »
firearms and Mustangs.  that's enough for me. 
modding cars can be really expensive.  I've spent as much as $10k at a time on my Mustang for a supercharger and other parts, and that's just one order.  I've changed out my exhaust 5 times on 1 of my Mustangs to get the sound and performance just right.  that must have been over $3k just for exhaust
I've slowed down on Mustang mods for now.  we don't have a track so not much more I want to do short of changing out the motor.
now I have to manage my dad's Mustang too, so that's take a little of my time as well.
firearms, Mustangs, exercise are my top 3 passtimes.  i do at least one of those things every day.
I spent way too much time on my 94 Mustang tweaking it.  Would have been a lot more fun if I did not have to worry about Calif CARB smog inspections and shitty low octane gas.  Almost brought the car to Hawaii, but God smiled on me and had a buddy ask to buy it.  Now it sits in his garage in OR waiting for $$, instead of in my garage where I do not have room.  Certainly no way to enjoy a fast car on Oahu.  Kona would be better, but I would rather just buy a factory car that has the performance the old 5.0 had by the time I was done with it.

If I had a nice storage shed to work on it, a Factory 5 Cobra replica would be fun.

Rocky

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #42 on: October 17, 2020, 12:05:35 PM »
The two happiest days in life:

1. The day you buy a new boat.

2. The day you sell the boat.

Also known as
"Hole in water you throw money into"  :rofl:
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

robtmc

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #43 on: October 17, 2020, 12:05:52 PM »
The two happiest days in life:

1. The day you buy a new boat.

2. The day you sell the boat.
Had heard all that many times, but we barged ahead, thinking "how hard can it be?"

robtmc

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #44 on: October 17, 2020, 12:13:06 PM »
Also known as
"Hole in water you throw money into"  :rofl:
We bought new, so there was no neglect or aging to be repaired.  Just the need to do the rigging.

Did my own electronics install, so that was just sweating in the blazing sun with no shade.  Drilling holes in a new boat was nerve wracking as hell.

Had almost forgot but the wife would not, needing to get the damn trailer safety inspected every year.  More money and stress driving around.

Registration, insurance, and DLNR ramp fees were just another PITA to keep up with.

The drive towing the boat up to Kawaihae was a straight shot with no real traffic or stress, and knowing it would be on Maui in a few days was a relief.

drck1000

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #45 on: October 17, 2020, 12:23:25 PM »
Not to discourage buying a boat, but it looks a lot better from the outside:

Had a boat for several years here in Kona.  Multi-year wait for a harbor slip, stored it in the adjacent storage facitlity.

The dirt, heat, mosquitos, and sun in that storage lot were the pits, even though we got a cover for the boat.  Boat storage fees climbed to over $2,000 a year.  No way to keep it at the house.

The whole routine of uncovering, hooking up the truck and pulling it to the ramp was chore #1. 

My wife usually did the driving chores while I ran around shoving the boat into the water, tying it up etc. Had to train ourselves how to do all that and not bash the boat into something  More stress.  Chore #2

Departing and cruising were what it was all about and that was great.

Coming into the ramp could go smooth or be a total bitch, wind dependent. More stress.  Chore #3

Winch onto the trailer, pull bilge plugs and drain. Tow to the washdown area and do the job, just grunt work, dragging out hoses around and brushing, no stress.  Tow back to the yard and try to be patient while the wife backs the trailer into the slot. More stress Chore #4

We finally decided we were getting a bit old to not enjoy all the associated work to get out on the water.  A slip would have been easier, but then you have all the issues of boat being in the water all the time:

Bottom paint to keep up, cannot clean the boat properly,  Need constant vigil on the batteries and bilge pumps, etc.  No thanks.

Sold the boat for 75% of what we paid, which is not bad.  If we miss getting out on the water, can rent a small boat.  Maintenance and getting it in and out of the water are someone else's job.

Just our experience as new boat owners YMMV
Ya, no interest in a boat here. Maybe, and huge maybe, if I ever were to fix up my dad’s house and live there, maybe. That said, I see what my buddies with boats need to do.

That and I hear stories of donkey’s at the launch. At least I know that stuff.

Funny you mention the boat ramp stuff. In WA, lots of places had docks where you could tie up and pretty much walk your boat onto the trailer. A couple places had slings. But, many of the smaller lakes had landings and weird angles. Being the “fishing partner”, my job was to drive around after dropping my buddy off (boat owner) so he could get the truck and trailer. Many times the wind would be cutting across the boat ramp. There were more than a few “wave offs” the first few trips out for me. Haha

groveler

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #46 on: October 17, 2020, 12:35:25 PM »
The two happiest days in life:

1. The day you buy a new boat.

2. The day you sell the boat.
I disagree.

I used to make boats and rebuild them.
I worked with a master shipwright when I was a kid.
so in a sense they were my Hobby.
My wife used to complain that I spent more time
working on them than sailing them.
If you can't do that kind of work,
a boat is a BIG hole in the water.
But how many of you can repair a rotted
plywood double diagonal planked hull?
Ignoring my time I broke even on my 45 footer.
and got a fair amount of sailing time and
memories from it.

Happiest day in life is doing twenty knots under sail drinking a Dos Equis,
have no where to be at for a few days, plenty of beer on board,
and fresh caught Crab in the tank.












Flapp_Jackson

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #47 on: October 17, 2020, 12:50:02 PM »
I disagree.

I used to make boats and rebuild them.
I worked with a master shipwright when I was a kid.
so in a sense they were my Hobby.
My wife used to complain that I spent more time
working on them than sailing them.
If you can't do that kind of work,
a boat is a BIG hole in the water.
But how many of you can repair a rotted
plywood double diagonal planked hull?
Ignoring my time I broke even on my 45 footer.
and got a fair amount of sailing time and
memories from it.

Happiest day in life is doing twenty knots under sail drinking a Dos Equis,
have no where to be at for a few days, plenty of beer on board,
and fresh caught Crab in the tank.

For every rule, there are exceptions.

Even this ^^^ one....   :geekdanc: :shaka:
"That's what laws are for...  If the right people don't break 'em, they're of no use whatsoever.""

RSN172

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #48 on: October 17, 2020, 01:31:18 PM »
I would like to get a new Mahoe sawmill to replace my 1994 Mobile Dimension.   Too expensive at $50k and Mobile Dimension is not made any more so parts are getting harder to find and maybe impossible to find in10 years.

drck1000

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #49 on: October 17, 2020, 04:39:44 PM »
I would like to get a new Mahoe sawmill to replace my 1994 Mobile Dimension.   Too expensive at $50k and Mobile Dimension is not made any more so parts are getting harder to find and maybe impossible to find in10 years.
50gs. You take the taco. Haha

I mean boys and their toys. Just the toys get more expensive as we get older. But dayum.

Heavies

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #50 on: October 17, 2020, 04:46:34 PM »
My only other hobby right now is surfing.  But I usually only use one surf board.  Hard to get rid of the others though, thinking I will use these on certain days or conditions, but I always end up going with the favorite.  Used to do classic cars and bikes, choppers, lowriders, hot rods... But now days have no time or room for that.  Maybe later.  I have a dang bike in my garage half built into a café racer, but has been sitting since my daughter was born and wife passed. 

Anyone want it?

RSN172

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #51 on: October 17, 2020, 05:11:25 PM »
I have a good friend who loves surfing and has about 10 boards.  Told him I going propose to the Lesgislature they make a bill to charge a yearly registration fee for surfboards, like $100 a year and put a big reg nbr on the board, like boats.  No reg, your board gets confiscated.  Good way to make money.  LOL.

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Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #52 on: October 18, 2020, 06:36:40 AM »
As firearms enthusiasts, we already have one expensive hobby. As least for most of us who actually shoot, not like #notarealdoctor. Haha

If you had some “extra” disposable income, for whatever reason, what could be the next hobby you take up? 

Say you gave up a previously expensive hobby, or  even a “what if” scenario.

A bunch of friends are into Ham radios in varying degrees. Some of them have the “basics”, but some have gone completely down the rabbit hole and are trying to get me to follow them. O.o
I was just thinking about this the other day. I used to collect coins and stamps. I sold all of my collections (Including half of my guns) to help pay for the move to Hawaii. While I got back into coins I did so without much enthusiasm and now I am giving all of the coins to one of my nephews to put towards his kids’ college fund.

I was thinking of getting another ‘69 El Camino. Now that is an expensive hobby. I love classic cars. I’ve had a few different Chevys a long time ago and was part of the CA car culture back in the ‘80’s and ‘90’s. It’s a great way to make new friends and get involved in the local community. Problem for me right now is my back and my knees have been really bad for a long time and it hurts to do things like washing and polishing a car. But I love turning a wrench on my cars and I can’t do that any more either.

What I have been getting interested in are handmade knives. There are a bunch really talented local knife makers out here and their work has really caught my eye.
Officially Retired and living in the free state of Arizona.

changemyoil66

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2020, 07:47:23 AM »
Dont get a boat, already too many "boating accidents".

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

ren

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2020, 10:09:34 AM »
trying to make Hawaii Republican

drck1000

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #55 on: October 18, 2020, 11:06:03 AM »
My only other hobby right now is surfing.  But I usually only use one surf board.  Hard to get rid of the others though, thinking I will use these on certain days or conditions, but I always end up going with the favorite.  Used to do classic cars and bikes, choppers, lowriders, hot rods... But now days have no time or room for that.  Maybe later.  I have a dang bike in my garage half built into a café racer, but has been sitting since my daughter was born and wife passed. 

Anyone want it?
Unless you start going with a quiver of boards, I don't think surfing is super expensive.  First cost, but then mostly "less expensive".  One of my buddies is into dirt biking and that is def an expensive hobby.  Especially when he recently got an electric dirt bike.  Haha

drck1000

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2020, 11:08:35 AM »
I was just thinking about this the other day. I used to collect coins and stamps. I sold all of my collections (Including half of my guns) to help pay for the move to Hawaii. While I got back into coins I did so without much enthusiasm and now I am giving all of the coins to one of my nephews to put towards his kids’ college fund.

I was thinking of getting another ‘69 El Camino. Now that is an expensive hobby. I love classic cars. I’ve had a few different Chevys a long time ago and was part of the CA car culture back in the ‘80’s and ‘90’s. It’s a great way to make new friends and get involved in the local community. Problem for me right now is my back and my knees have been really bad for a long time and it hurts to do things like washing and polishing a car. But I love turning a wrench on my cars and I can’t do that any more either.

What I have been getting interested in are handmade knives. There are a bunch really talented local knife makers out here and their work has really caught my eye.
I heard coin collecting can get "deep".  So much so learn, but also a lot of folks now knowing what they have.  Similar with sports memorabilia and sports cards. 

Hand made knives would be interesting.  A friend in TN makes them out of all sorts of stuff, like old files and stuff.  He does everything except the heat treat.  I have a few of this blades and they are awesome.  Good to have lead on someone who can make a knife to my exact specs. 

Flapp_Jackson

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #57 on: October 18, 2020, 01:01:26 PM »
I heard coin collecting can get "deep".  So much so learn, but also a lot of folks now knowing what they have.  Similar with sports memorabilia and sports cards. 

Hand made knives would be interesting.  A friend in TN makes them out of all sorts of stuff, like old files and stuff.  He does everything except the heat treat.  I have a few of this blades and they are awesome.  Good to have lead on someone who can make a knife to my exact specs.

I think many coin collectors get started by using a metal detector to go "prospecting."  They find a few very valuable coins, jewelry, etc., and it reinforces their desire to continue looking for the next big score.

I think it also applies to the professional collectors who buy, sell and trade them.  Trading for a rare coin in hopes the value increases over time or happens to be more rare than first thought might result in a million dollar windfall.  On the other hand, there could be a new stash of the coins discovered that floods the market and makes yours worth less than it cost you.

If doing this professionally, you are only as successful as the information and experience backing up your activities.  if it's just a hobby, and you're more interested in the history of the samples you collect, then you probably aren't worried as much about being scammed.  Value is in the eye of the collector.

I've been to a few coin dealers.  They often buy direct from the US Mint.  I was looking for a proof set for my daughter -- penny, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar plus the silver dollar commemoratives for her birth year.  He was selling them for about double what the mint charged.  I found the same sets for less than the mint's original price.  The older a proof set is, the more dealers charged.  This was only about 2 years after minting.

A "proof" is an uncirculated coin that has been "double-stamped" to ensure the best possible detail and a very shiny surface around the embossings.

Both my daughters have proof sets from their birth years in my safe deposit box.  I also gave my daughter a set when her daughter was born.  If nothing else, it's a nice keepsake.  Best case, maybe the sets increase in value, or it sparks an interest that becomes a hobby.   :thumbsup:
"That's what laws are for...  If the right people don't break 'em, they're of no use whatsoever.""

Rocky

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #58 on: October 18, 2020, 01:21:40 PM »
I heard coin collecting can get "deep".  So much so learn, but also a lot of folks now knowing what they have. 
Coins too Heavy, gimme that folding stuff with famous peeps on'em
http://coolserialnumbers.com/Wanted.aspx
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

drck1000

Re: Expensive Hobby - What’s Your Next One?
« Reply #59 on: October 18, 2020, 02:05:08 PM »
Coins too Heavy, gimme that folding stuff with famous peeps on'em
http://coolserialnumbers.com/Wanted.aspx
Not into coins. But my grandma worked at a bank and she collected a bunch of coins when she was working. Had some really old coins as well as stuff from WWII timeframe, including the “HAWAII” marked bills.