Prescription shooting glasses (Read 3978 times)

Tom_G

Prescription shooting glasses
« on: April 14, 2015, 08:03:08 AM »
For a couple of years now, I've had a pair of prescription glasses for reading, and they really make a difference in seeing those tiny details.  I've also come to realize that the guns I've been gravitating towards share a characteristic: broad front sights.  I have a hard time seeing the fine blades.  So, I'm beginning to think that a pair of prescription shooting glasses may be the thing.

Anyone have recommendations?  Recommended sources?  Success/horror stories?
The difference between theory and reality is that, in theory, there is no difference between theory and reality.

Q

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2015, 10:22:17 AM »
For a couple of years now, I've had a pair of prescription glasses for reading, and they really make a difference in seeing those tiny details.  I've also come to realize that the guns I've been gravitating towards share a characteristic: broad front sights.  I have a hard time seeing the fine blades.  So, I'm beginning to think that a pair of prescription shooting glasses may be the thing.

Anyone have recommendations?  Recommended sources?  Success/horror stories?
In the military, we used either prescription Willey-X or Oakley M-Frames, with the latter being preferred if you can afford it.

new guy

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2015, 02:42:41 PM »
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« Last Edit: August 12, 2016, 12:06:15 AM by new guy »
Best of luck, all.

Q

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2015, 03:41:56 PM »
Tom, below is a link to a somewhat related thread, from awhile ago.

https://2ahawaii.com/index.php?topic=10581.0

I still have (and like) my Wiley-X Blinks with prescription Transition lenses.

As previously stated, I wish they were polarized, but polarized Transition lenses were not available when I ordered my glasses.

I think macsak said that the Transition lenses now come with an option for polarized lenses.

I like my Wiley-X Blinks; they came with headstrap and foam inserts (to assist motorcyclist with buffering wind), they fit my face well, and they are not super heavy.  They supposedly exceed ANZI requirements, as well.

I like the Transition lenses because they offer protection in the sun, but turn clear in low/no light environments, so I imagine that they could be used at both indoor and outdoor ranges.

I do wish the Transition lenses got darker, in direct sunlight, though.

Also, something to think about is making sure the frames/glasses you select can accommodate your prescription... I know a guy who cannot use many types of common eye protection frames because 1) his prescription requires lenses that are thicker than what many frames can accommodate, and 2) the wrap-around style found on many of the more popular eye protection frames has a negative impact on his prescription lenses and ends up distorting his vision and giving him headaches.

Best of luck!  :shaka:
Macsak wears prescription glasses?

new guy

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2015, 04:14:38 PM »
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« Last Edit: August 12, 2016, 12:05:37 AM by new guy »
Best of luck, all.

ren

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2015, 04:40:13 PM »
I recently went on a similar endeavor and have Bob Jones inserts +5 diopter in my service rifle sights. I also went with a fatter, USGI front sight for my service rifle as well. I have 20/15 by that doesn't mean anything when presbyopia kicks in. Before I ran a .052 front sight with a .038 aperture from when I first started shooting highpower in my late 20s. Around late 30s till now my scores started to fall and groups opened up. One of the factors was that I struggled to read objects up close - a symptom of presbyopia (hardening of the lense). A trip to the Optometrist confirmed it and I got a prescription for +5. It is also important to let the Dr. know at what distance you will be focusing on. Front sight. Now I use a USGI front sight (which I think is .072) and a .040 aperture rear. I also use Scotch tape on my glasses for my non-shooting eye which resulted in less headaches after a long match.
It is also a misconception that a smaller front sight will give you more "precision" - but think of it this way, if you struggle to see your sights how do you know where your rifle is pointing? Also, the smaller sight can get lost in the target and then your eye will focus on the object that is the easiest - which is the target and your shooting will suffer.
A sharp, clear front sight is the last thing you should see the instant before you press that trigger. Easier said than done.

« Last Edit: April 15, 2015, 04:47:37 PM by ren »

jc2721

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2015, 03:16:40 AM »
I have the same problem seeing the front sight, so I called my doctor and got her ok to bring in a rifle and a pistol.  It took a while but we found an Rx that worked pretty well and I had a new set of lenses made.

mauidog

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2015, 04:12:57 AM »
I have the same problem seeing the front sight, so I called my doctor and got her ok to bring in a rifle and a pistol.  It took a while but we found an Rx that worked pretty well and I had a new set of lenses made.

I guess you aren't worried about getting the "do you own any guns?" survey questions!
An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it.   -- Jeff Cooper

survivorman

Re: Prescription shooting glasses
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2016, 08:15:10 PM »
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00KSJNLO0/?tag=2ahawaii-20

Found these magnified safety glasses on Amazon. They come in a multitude of magnification from +.5 and up.   Got a pair to try since they were so cheap and offered some protection.  They seem to be of reasonable quality and the earstems are nice a thin to fit under earpro.   I started with the lowest magnification and will se how they do at the range. 
I think I'll get a pair of the +2 for cleaning the guns to keep debris out of the eyes and not wreck my reading glasses with solvents etc.