Hearing test (Read 4348 times)

zippz

Hearing test
« on: September 23, 2016, 05:13:17 PM »
Try this out and post your results.  Try it with speakers and headphones.

I got up to 16k, with a slight drop at 12.6k and return at 13.1k.  Age 40

http://onlinetonegenerator.com/hearingtest.html
« Last Edit: September 23, 2016, 07:26:07 PM by zippz »
Join the Hawaii Firearms Coalition at www.hifico.org.  Hawaii's new non-profit gun rights organization focused on lobbying and grassroots activism.

Hawaii Shooting Calendar - https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=practicalmarksman.com_btllod1boifgpp8dcjnbnruhso%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=Pacific/Honolulu

oldfart

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2016, 06:13:58 PM »
Try this out and post your results.  Try it with speakers and headphones.

I got up to 16k, with a slight drop at 12.6k and return at 13.1k.  Age 40
...
Huh?
What, Me Worry?

Jl808

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2016, 06:16:29 PM »
Link?
I think, therefore I am armed.
NRA Life Patron member, HRA Life member, HiFiCo Life Member, HDF member

The United States Constitution © 1791. All Rights Reserved.

zippz

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2016, 07:26:18 PM »
Join the Hawaii Firearms Coalition at www.hifico.org.  Hawaii's new non-profit gun rights organization focused on lobbying and grassroots activism.

Hawaii Shooting Calendar - https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=practicalmarksman.com_btllod1boifgpp8dcjnbnruhso%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=Pacific/Honolulu

macsak

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2016, 07:35:24 PM »

suka

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2016, 09:01:13 PM »
Cheap and built in speakers can't play frequencies over 16k-17k.

My RTA drops flat when I measured the laptop built in speakers at 18khz. at a -12db.

On my High end speakers capable of playing the full 20-20k spectrum;  frequencies over 19khz can still be heard.

ren

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2016, 10:03:34 PM »
Cheap and built in speakers can't play frequencies over 16k-17k.

My RTA drops flat when I measured the laptop built in speakers at 18khz. at a -12db.

On my High end speakers capable of playing the full 20-20k spectrum;  frequencies over 19khz can still be heard.


If I remember weren't you in a sound off at the Blaisdell in the early 90s? Toyota Camry?
I think it was Island Sound sponsoring it.
If I could go back in time with kick panel speakers and Bluetooth. Back then most installers were putting component speakers all over the place without any understanding of path lengths.

Richard Clark's Grand National was such a mysterious car then...


http://www.usdaudio.com/sw/cars/buick/buick-waveguide-mold-plug.jpg



I still have a PPI 4100 AM in my car. Replaced all the electrolytic caps as they leaked. Bought it in 1992.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2016, 10:11:33 PM by ren »

PeaShooter

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2016, 10:08:00 PM »
I used to have great hearing but at some point I suspect I damaged it by listening to music too loud, now I have constant slight ringing in both ears and significant loss of high frequency hearing in the left ear only. Depending on the angle of the sound coming into my ears, the high frequency hearing in the left ear still works. (With earphones or regular speakers pointing straight sideways into my ear hole I can still hear high frequencies at normal volume, but with regular speakers at a normal position diagonally in front of me, my left ear has no high frequency hearing).

Aside from speakers, actually the thing that is most likely to cut-off high frequency hearing is the Digital-to-Analog Audio converter, whether that be your computer's sound card/chip, your CD/DVD/Blu-ray player, your HDTV, your amplifier/receiver, or your speakers themselves, depending on your setup. Many DACs cut off all high-frequency sound over 16 kHz with a brickwall filter. Good speakers should be able to play high frequency sounds up to 20 kHz but some can play past 40 kHz, it depends on the tweeter technology. (Very expensive speakers won't necessarily focus on high frequency reproduction).

If your test let you hear up to 16 kHz it is likely your hearing goes beyond and your player/computer is what brickwalled the high frequency sound.

One random example of brickwalling, the original fat PS3s have a normal good-quality DAC that brickwalls high-frequency sounds (dunno at what frequency). The slim PS3s replaced it with a cheapass audio DAC that does not filter high-frequency sounds at all (technically this is a good thing but the rest of the audio DAC is also very bad and sounds like shit). This is extremely obvious to hear because in certain games, or at the PS3 system menus, you just move around and hear the artificial clicking noise play...and on the slim PS3s instead of going "click" it goes "click.....PAK!!!!!" each time. The PAK is the end of the sound snippet. This only matters if you use the analog audio out of the PS3, which many people don't use.

ren

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2016, 10:13:45 PM »
I used to have great hearing but at some point I suspect I damaged it by listening to music too loud, now I have constant slight ringing in both ears and significant loss of high frequency hearing in the left ear only. Depending on the angle of the sound coming into my ears, the high frequency hearing in the left ear still works. (With earphones or regular speakers pointing straight sideways into my ear hole I can still hear high frequencies at normal volume, but with regular speakers at a normal position diagonally in front of me, my left ear has no high frequency hearing).

Aside from speakers, actually the thing that is most likely to cut-off high frequency hearing is the Digital-to-Analog Audio converter, whether that be your computer's sound card/chip, your CD/DVD/Blu-ray player, your HDTV, your amplifier/receiver, or your speakers themselves, depending on your setup. Many DACs cut off all high-frequency sound over 16 kHz with a brickwall filter. Good speakers should be able to play high frequency sounds up to 20 kHz but some can play past 40 kHz, it depends on the tweeter technology. (Very expensive speakers won't necessarily focus on high frequency reproduction).

If your test let you hear up to 16 kHz it is likely your hearing goes beyond and your player/computer is what brickwalled the high frequency sound.

One random example of brickwalling, the original fat PS3s have a normal good-quality DAC that brickwalls high-frequency sounds (dunno at what frequency). The slim PS3s replaced it with a cheapass audio DAC that does not filter high-frequency sounds at all (technically this is a good thing but the rest of the audio DAC is also very bad and sounds like shit). This is extremely obvious to hear because in certain games, or at the PS3 system menus, you just move around and hear the artificial clicking noise play...and on the slim PS3s instead of going "click" it goes "click.....PAK!!!!!" each time. The PAK is the end of the sound snippet. This only matters if you use the analog audio out of the PS3, which many people don't use.

if I remember at 8khz, it becomes very directional.

PeaShooter

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2016, 10:24:46 PM »
My right ear isn't weird like that though, and I'm pretty sure my left ear wasn't like that either before I damaged it. I damaged both my ears at about the same time but the left ear got the worst of it. I don't know anything about the supposed directionality of human hearing offhand, just saying that's what I experience.

suka

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2016, 05:37:17 AM »
ren , u smart    :thumbsup:

Jl808

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2016, 07:08:18 AM »
Interesting test... heard everything all the way to 13.5K then it drops off after that.  Kept the sound low as the higher frequency hurt the ears.

I'm going to look for good speakers and try the test again.
I think, therefore I am armed.
NRA Life Patron member, HRA Life member, HiFiCo Life Member, HDF member

The United States Constitution © 1791. All Rights Reserved.

oldfart

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2016, 09:18:54 AM »
I do have tinnitus at age 60.
Got up to around 11 to 12khz with speakers or headphones.
What, Me Worry?

whynow?

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2016, 01:29:34 PM »
Damaged hearing from work.  Was only allowed hearing aid for one side thru WC although the other side is also bad.   Damn vent blowers, needle gunning and air arcing work  affects a lot of guys.
They ask, why some didn't have ear pro on, it's hard to communicate on sound powered phones or 2 way radio during testing or other critical ops wearing plugs or muffs.   Our workplace never got into the electronic ears that the shooting community has.

robtmc

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2016, 08:40:51 AM »
No point in trying, seen my curves too many times over recent decades to not know I am fast approaching the doorknob phase.  Wife knows and has to deal with it daily.

That and blowing out my inner ear diving seven years ago left one ear essentially inop.  Do not even have stereo anymore, a real pain not knowing where a sound is coming from.

Hearing aids make my ears sticky, and I forget about water, a PITA if you boat or go to beach.

Rocky

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2016, 11:19:15 AM »
WIERD.
In this test, I lose it at 10,300 ish hertz but I can hear VERY well ( thought  :P).
Just losing it at the high's.
5 years masonry  driving dump trucks, front end loaders and air hammers  O0
Gave it up to do light's and sound in a Rock n' Roll band for 2 years  8)

    I just "ear candled" before the test, wish I saw post earlier to compare.
Oh well, I'll candle Rockette for a before and after test.  ;D
« Last Edit: October 24, 2016, 05:28:36 PM by Rocky »
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

zippz

Re: Hearing test
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2016, 11:41:51 AM »
I have pretty good hearing and try to keep it that way, but I do have a little bit of tinnitus.  Forgot to put on my earpro when my partner test fired a 50cal machine gun and a couple of loud nightclubs.  I got a pair of Sport Ears electronic earplugs which are great to have since I can leave them in all day at the range and so I don't forget to put them in.  I can also use them at loud concerts and nightclubs too without anyone noticing.  Best investment I've made to protect my hearing.

I hate people who use muzzle brakes.  I don't think they realize the blast from that can hurt their hearing and those around them even using hearing protection.

My father has very bad hearing from working around machinery without earpro.  I have to yell to talk to him.
Join the Hawaii Firearms Coalition at www.hifico.org.  Hawaii's new non-profit gun rights organization focused on lobbying and grassroots activism.

Hawaii Shooting Calendar - https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=practicalmarksman.com_btllod1boifgpp8dcjnbnruhso%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=Pacific/Honolulu