Firearms Training - Sharing Experience (Read 27597 times)

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #160 on: February 12, 2020, 08:57:56 AM »
The adjuster is all the way forward in that pic.

I thought you had QD on the stock as well, but you have it looped through. Tough to tell from the pic how much length you lost via that, but you should still have plenty of room. I’ve seen that sling work well for pretty big dudes and the front was attached to near the muzzle end of the rail.

The adjuster is all forward just for the pic.  But the slack on the side that attached to the stock is about 1.5 inches pass the plastic clip. I'm probably just more used to shooting with no sling.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #161 on: February 18, 2020, 09:36:21 AM »
Shot a match this past weekend.  Weather was awesome and was a fun day on the range.  Shot like crap for most of the stages, but had a couple of stages where I was able to settle down and did well.  Even though I shot like crap, was good that my overall score was "decent".  And by decent, I meant relative in that I didn't lose to, well, someone who has been shooting quite a bit better in recent matches.   8)

Some notes:

1) NEVER forget fundamentals.  I have been working on economy of motion and reducing the "dead time".  That includes speeding up trannys (yes, I did that as tourettes bait  ;D ), being ready (body, gun, etc) when arriving on station, etc.  In previous matches (maybe 2-3 matches ago) I had shot quite well score wise with a high(ish) percentage of As, but times was where I seemed to suffer.  I was finishing behind folks that had much faster times, but with less A-zone hits, and even the mike or 2-3.  So I decided to try to push the times.  I did notice that my times were improving, but in some cases at the expense of good hits.  This past weekend, I guess I was so focused on speeding things up that my hits really suffered in the first two stages.  The first stage started off with an array of steel that I started off with a hit, but then some misses as I was transitioning to the next steel.  Had to relax and focus and get my hits and that cost me both time and throwing things off for the rest of the stage.

2) The "thrown off" from stage 1 continued on stage 2.  There were multiple swingers with a pair that was obscured by no shoots, with one target in particular with a pretty small window.  I was pretty focused on that first swinger and apparently so focused that I fcuked up the first static target.  Good news was that I got As on the swinger that I was so focused on, but messed up bad on the medium (not quite easy) target before it.  Was disappointed in myself for sure, but I also caught grief from others in my squad  :( which was well deserved.   :rofl:

3) Good thing that there was quite a bit of downtime between stages 2 and 3.  Enough that it allowed time to reset and it showed on the results.  I call equipment malfunction on stage 4 as I heard the hit on the #1 steel but it didn't fall, so it cost me another second or so for the pick up after the paper.  While I was happy with essentially 1 for 1 hits on steel, the pickup cost me the stage (when I looked at the results after) for my division.  Of course jokingly call equipment malfunction since there was a lot of interesting results on that stage.  Some folks were getting good center hits and the steel didn't fall and we would joke with them that their ammo was loaded too light.  I shoot factory ammo, so I usually don't have an issue that the "poof poof" guys do.   :rofl:  The RO said my hit on the first steel was off to the edge, so  :(

4) Stick to your game.  It's easy to get caught up in watching others in their runs through the stages.  Particularly the PCC guys who seem to blaze through the stages.  I find that I tend to want to match their pace and it usually costs me.  That was the case with our last stage, which was a qualifier.  The stage included two sets of two "easy" targets and a more difficult target that was obscured by a no-shoot.  I am usually cognizant of the pace on the transitions between high percentage to low percentage targets, but I think I flat out pushed things too much and hits suffered.   :(

While I shot like crap, I was actually wanting to get back on the range soon.  I think what I failed at can be readily corrected.  A lot of it is mental and just need to get out of my way at times.  Overall, a fun day on the range and look forward to more. 

macsak

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #162 on: February 18, 2020, 10:41:00 AM »
you should always beat that guy by a lot
he doesn't even own any firearms, ammo, belt or holster...

Shot a match this past weekend.  Weather was awesome and was a fun day on the range.  Shot like crap for most of the stages, but had a couple of stages where I was able to settle down and did well.  Even though I shot like crap, was good that my overall score was "decent".  And by decent, I meant relative in that I didn't lose to, well, someone who has been shooting quite a bit better in recent matches.   8)

Some notes:

1) NEVER forget fundamentals.  I have been working on economy of motion and reducing the "dead time".  That includes speeding up trannys (yes, I did that as tourettes bait  ;D ), being ready (body, gun, etc) when arriving on station, etc.  In previous matches (maybe 2-3 matches ago) I had shot quite well score wise with a high(ish) percentage of As, but times was where I seemed to suffer.  I was finishing behind folks that had much faster times, but with less A-zone hits, and even the mike or 2-3.  So I decided to try to push the times.  I did notice that my times were improving, but in some cases at the expense of good hits.  This past weekend, I guess I was so focused on speeding things up that my hits really suffered in the first two stages.  The first stage started off with an array of steel that I started off with a hit, but then some misses as I was transitioning to the next steel.  Had to relax and focus and get my hits and that cost me both time and throwing things off for the rest of the stage.

2) The "thrown off" from stage 1 continued on stage 2.  There were multiple swingers with a pair that was obscured by no shoots, with one target in particular with a pretty small window.  I was pretty focused on that first swinger and apparently so focused that I fcuked up the first static target.  Good news was that I got As on the swinger that I was so focused on, but messed up bad on the medium (not quite easy) target before it.  Was disappointed in myself for sure, but I also caught grief from others in my squad  :( which was well deserved.   :rofl:

3) Good thing that there was quite a bit of downtime between stages 2 and 3.  Enough that it allowed time to reset and it showed on the results.  I call equipment malfunction on stage 4 as I heard the hit on the #1 steel but it didn't fall, so it cost me another second or so for the pick up after the paper.  While I was happy with essentially 1 for 1 hits on steel, the pickup cost me the stage (when I looked at the results after) for my division.  Of course jokingly call equipment malfunction since there was a lot of interesting results on that stage.  Some folks were getting good center hits and the steel didn't fall and we would joke with them that their ammo was loaded too light.  I shoot factory ammo, so I usually don't have an issue that the "poof poof" guys do.   :rofl:  The RO said my hit on the first steel was off to the edge, so  :(

4) Stick to your game.  It's easy to get caught up in watching others in their runs through the stages.  Particularly the PCC guys who seem to blaze through the stages.  I find that I tend to want to match their pace and it usually costs me.  That was the case with our last stage, which was a qualifier.  The stage included two sets of two "easy" targets and a more difficult target that was obscured by a no-shoot.  I am usually cognizant of the pace on the transitions between high percentage to low percentage targets, but I think I flat out pushed things too much and hits suffered.   :(

While I shot like crap, I was actually wanting to get back on the range soon.  I think what I failed at can be readily corrected.  A lot of it is mental and just need to get out of my way at times.  Overall, a fun day on the range and look forward to more.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #163 on: February 18, 2020, 11:36:39 AM »
you should always beat that guy by a lot
he doesn't even own any firearms, ammo, belt or holster...
Sounds like quite a dull person. . .  :rofl:

Surf

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #164 on: February 19, 2020, 10:56:34 AM »
Video is King, I think you are shooting it and going over game film.  If you want to share it with me I will review it, and personalize some training takeaways for you. 

We hope to get to our competition events.  Stage planning, target arrays, moving in and out, lots of reps of live fire stages.  That may need to be an extended 2 gun Big Island event for the serious.  ;)

Drakiir84

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #165 on: February 19, 2020, 02:10:11 PM »
Video is King, I think you are shooting it and going over game film.  If you want to share it with me I will review it, and personalize some training takeaways for you. 

We hope to get to our competition events.  Stage planning, target arrays, moving in and out, lots of reps of live fire stages.  That may need to be an extended 2 gun Big Island event for the serious.  ;)

Now that's what I call a vacation.  Was super stoked for next month's class only to be reminded we're taking the baby to Maui to visit Great Grandpa on that weekend lol....
"The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no mistake about that. It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of its user. It is equally useful in securing meat for the table, destroying group enemies on the battlefield, and resisting tyranny. In fact, it is the only means of resisting tyranny, since a citizenry armed with rifles simply cannot be tyrannized."
-Jeff Cooper

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #166 on: February 19, 2020, 08:10:56 PM »
Video is King, I think you are shooting it and going over game film.  If you want to share it with me I will review it, and personalize some training takeaways for you. 

We hope to get to our competition events.  Stage planning, target arrays, moving in and out, lots of reps of live fire stages.  That may need to be an extended 2 gun Big Island event for the serious.  ;)
Yup, I have video.  Just like golf, excellent for analysis and improvement, but also can be tough pill to swallow at times.  Catching yourself doing stuff you either know you shouldn't do, know better, or wouldn't normally do and can't explain why you did that time.  Video doesn't lie though. . .  :(  While I am disappointed when I shoot poorly, but it also motivates me to put in the practice to improve.   ;D

Yeah, I'll take you up on that when you aren't as crazy busy.  Can always use training takeaways and always room for improvement. 

Shooting with better shooters would be awesome.  Live fire stages are something that I would love to put in more time with, particularly on the Big Island.   :geekdanc:

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #167 on: February 19, 2020, 08:12:09 PM »
Now that's what I call a vacation.  Was super stoked for next month's class only to be reminded we're taking the baby to Maui to visit Great Grandpa on that weekend lol....
Opportunities like that are priceless.  Experiences with Great Grandpa is particularly priceless though.   :thumbsup:

Drakiir84

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #168 on: February 19, 2020, 10:43:35 PM »
Opportunities like that are priceless.  Experiences with Great Grandpa is particularly priceless though.   
Yeah man.  Fortunately he's still in great shape and going strong.  He's seen the great grandkids a few times but it's so crazy how much development takes place in the early years.  And Zoey definitely takes after me.....  we're screwed lolol

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

"The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no mistake about that. It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of its user. It is equally useful in securing meat for the table, destroying group enemies on the battlefield, and resisting tyranny. In fact, it is the only means of resisting tyranny, since a citizenry armed with rifles simply cannot be tyrannized."
-Jeff Cooper

Surf

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #169 on: February 20, 2020, 08:08:10 PM »
Now that's what I call a vacation.  Was super stoked for next month's class only to be reminded we're taking the baby to Maui to visit Great Grandpa on that weekend lol....
Not a problem my friend, family first, life's short.  There will be another time for shooting!

changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #170 on: February 24, 2020, 11:39:28 AM »
Took the HDF carbine skill builder which required a sling. They don't, unless it's the combo class (pistol/rifle).

Take aways

1) Half the group were new faces that I've never seen before.  Well that half had safety selector engagement issues.  They wouldn't engage safety between reloads or before moving.  At the end of the class, we all have to name "1 ah-ha moment".  And this half of the group was that.  The other half who are regulars all didn't have safety issues.

2) Lots of guys don't train with the sling.  They buy it, but you can tell they have trouble putting it on, taking off, reloading etc... So practice, practice, practice.

3) My "ah-ha" moment was when going down stairs, do a low ready.  This way you can get on target faster.  I always go high ready, so now I have to remember that if going down stairs.

4) A few months ago at the last carbine skill builder, we had to walk between 2 cones which were about 7 yards apart from each other.  Walk from A to B, and B to A while getting 1 hit on a bowling pin that was about 15 yards away.  Going left to right was easy because I'm a right hander.  But when walking back the other way, I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn.  I tried back peddling, switching to support side, and even twisting at the waist. Zero hits all exercise.  So this time I got redemption.  I shot from support side and got my hits easily.  Note: since this one was slung, I had to do a sling transition as well.

5) The newer guys didn't realize sight over bore.  But adjusted after the first exercise.

So in the end, even though I don't notice, the HDF skill builders does teach me and everyone a lot.  Because we could see the regulars performance vs the 1st timers performance.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #171 on: February 25, 2020, 08:42:33 AM »
Took the HDF carbine skill builder which required a sling. They don't, unless it's the combo class (pistol/rifle).

Take aways

1) Half the group were new faces that I've never seen before.  Well that half had safety selector engagement issues.  They wouldn't engage safety between reloads or before moving.  At the end of the class, we all have to name "1 ah-ha moment".  And this half of the group was that.  The other half who are regulars all didn't have safety issues.

2) Lots of guys don't train with the sling.  They buy it, but you can tell they have trouble putting it on, taking off, reloading etc... So practice, practice, practice.

3) My "ah-ha" moment was when going down stairs, do a low ready.  This way you can get on target faster.  I always go high ready, so now I have to remember that if going down stairs.

4) A few months ago at the last carbine skill builder, we had to walk between 2 cones which were about 7 yards apart from each other.  Walk from A to B, and B to A while getting 1 hit on a bowling pin that was about 15 yards away.  Going left to right was easy because I'm a right hander.  But when walking back the other way, I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn.  I tried back peddling, switching to support side, and even twisting at the waist. Zero hits all exercise.  So this time I got redemption.  I shot from support side and got my hits easily.  Note: since this one was slung, I had to do a sling transition as well.

5) The newer guys didn't realize sight over bore.  But adjusted after the first exercise.

So in the end, even though I don't notice, the HDF skill builders does teach me and everyone a lot.  Because we could see the regulars performance vs the 1st timers performance.
Awesome!  Thank you for sharing your experiences.  It will be very helpful for others to get a feel for what goes on in training, classes, matches, etc and encourages them to come out and participate.  I think the unknowns is what often prevents folks from coming out. 

1) Use of the safety is absolutely critical, particularly involving folks newer to training and especially with stuff like movement is involved.  It's so easy for newer shooters (or those not used to shooting other than from a bench) to get caught up in a course of fire and not work the safety.  I've been to classes where not working the safety will get you pulled off of the range for some "correction", particularly in courses of fire that involve movement, like going standing to kneeling, to prone, etc.  Repeated correction can end your training day. 

2) Very true and I've seen it as well.  I'll add that shooting, particularly all of the required manipulations, can be eye opening when doing so with a sling for the first time.  Need to find what works for you, and that also includes how the slung rifle works with other things. 

It's awesome to see the progression and good to hear that you're seeing and appreciating the benefits of the skill builders. 

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #172 on: February 25, 2020, 08:49:38 AM »
Hit the range this past weekend.  Nothing formal but just good to get out and work on some things.  Was able to run a cold drill and then work on stuff like speeding up my draw and reducing time to first hit, particularly with the RDS handgun. 

I have been wanting to bring out my CZ for a future pistol match, so spent some time working with that gun.  The DA/SA in particular, as well as reloads.  While I certainly enjoy shooting a variety of guns, I'm not leaning towards sticking to certain platforms and really working on those and not switch around as much.  Sort of getting out of the "variety phase", as an instructor mentioned to be before.  I mean I will still enjoy shooting other handguns and rifles, but I think I will be sticking to training and shooting matches with a particular platform.  Getting back into shooting matches lately really energized me and had me looking at trying different guns and even divisions.  I was even considering updating the sights and getting more mags for my RIA 1911 and trying some single stack, but will most likely put that off.  At least for a while.  More money for ammo, which is certainly needed as shooting more often lately has put a pretty good sized dent in the "stash". 

WTF?Shane

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #173 on: February 26, 2020, 09:16:48 AM »
I have phases where I want something new and the CZ Shadow 2 was on my radar for the past year or so. I'm holding myself back because I need to invest more time playing/practicing (forreals, not just plinking) with my current firearms.

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #174 on: February 26, 2020, 12:04:40 PM »
I have phases where I want something new and the CZ Shadow 2 was on my radar for the past year or so. I'm holding myself back because I need to invest more time playing/practicing (forreals, not just plinking) with my current firearms.
I'm taking a similar route where I'm going to focus more on the "main" platforms moving forward with training, competition, etc. 

I picked up a CZ 75 SP-01 Shadow and PPQ 5" 3-4 years ago for shooting matches.  However, family and work stuff happened shortly after that and pretty much shut down my shooting activities for a while.  I was able to shoot the PPQ in one match, but not the CZ.  I have been shooting matches more consistently since last Dec and really got the bug back, so I was looking at shooting the CZ and PPQ again, which is why I shot the CZ this past weekend.  A while back, a trusted shooting friend/influence mentioned that I had been going through the "expansion" phase and trying this and that.  While I think I will always have the "want something new", I'm going to concentrate on what I've got, at least for now, and dedicate more time and ammo on those. 

I've been putting in a bunch of OT lately and some changes with work had me looking at picking up something new (PCC and other stuff).  I think I'll still get a PCC, but don't think I'll get another handgun.  More $$$ for ammo.   ;D

Rocky

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #175 on: February 27, 2020, 08:14:16 AM »
Awesome!  Thank you for sharing your experiences.  It will be very helpful for others to get a feel for what goes on in training, classes, matches, etc and encourages them to come out and participate.  I think the unknowns is what often prevents folks from coming out. 

1) Use of the safety is absolutely critical, particularly involving folks newer to training and especially with stuff like movement is involved.  It's so easy for newer shooters (or those not used to shooting other than from a bench) to get caught up in a course of fire and not work the safety.  I've been to classes where not working the safety will get you pulled off of the range for some "correction", particularly in courses of fire that involve movement, like going standing to kneeling, to prone, etc.  Repeated correction can end your training day. 
I also originally had  safety engaging issues, mostly because it broke my grip some and felt uncomfortable.    :crazy:
Installed bilateral safety and that cured my issues and mow the "sweep" is second nature.  :thumbsup:
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #176 on: February 27, 2020, 12:18:15 PM »
I also originally had  safety engaging issues, mostly because it broke my grip some and felt uncomfortable.    :crazy:
Installed bilateral safety and that cured my issues and mow the "sweep" is second nature.  :thumbsup:
"mow the sweep"?   ???

Was there a new technique that I missed?   ;D  :rofl:

Rocky

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #177 on: February 27, 2020, 06:08:29 PM »
"mow the sweep"?   ???

Was there a new technique that I missed?   ;D  :rofl:
"NOW the sweep"
Note to self.
Need glasses more when typing than shooting ?  :wacko:
drum roll .............
“I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made.”
                                                           Franklin D. Roosevelt

drck1000

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #178 on: March 02, 2020, 09:13:31 AM »
Did quite a bit of shooting this past weekend.  Focus was on "unfkcing things when I shoot pistol". . .  :(

Shooting is a perishable skill is something I'm sure we've all heard, and I for one have experienced many times.  Particularly in recent years when I've had lengthy breaks from shooting.  However, shooting often, at least for me, can have detrimental effects.  Trying to solve a specific issue, or get better at something sometimes results in slight tweaks away from "the foundation".  That and reps with bad fundamentals is simply bad.  I think that's where I had been going and results in a couple of recent matches showed that. 

When I find that my pistol shooting is off, I do a lot of ball and dummy drills.  But prior to that, I was doing some dry manipulations at home and found that my support hand grip crept slightly forward.  I think that was a result of wanting to shoot flatter and exaggerate the "locking out" of my support hand, mostly due to wanting to track the RDS better/faster.  Well, I noticed that that creep resulted in a gap in my grip near the thumb pad of my support hand.  That was something that a keen eye instructor has mentioned a while back.  I had corrected that, but seems to have returned.  So that was one example of a return to solid foundation that I worked on.  Second, was a slight adjustment with the thumb on my shooting hand.  Both of those showed promising results in the ball and dummy drills, as well as showed on paper. 

Looking back at previous match results, I found that in my effort to push times, my hits really suffered.  Particularly with more mikes.  So I wanted to get back to smoothing things out (not necessarily slowing things down). That included paying more attention to shot difficulty, being faster on the transitions as opposed to pushing splits, and lastly, blocking out the pace that the PCC and open shooters go about the stages.  That pace tends to stick in my mind at what is possible and I tend to pushing things a bit too fast. 

The first three stages went pretty well with the keys from recent practice.  Looking back at the video, could work on the transitions and such, but hit factor went way up.  On one stage, my time was "decent", but I had all As and one C.  That's getting back to the hits that I used to get when I first started out and was focused on hits as opposed to pushing the time. 

The last two stages were classifiers, both included shooting around barricades that made for interesting shooting positions and angles.  The other included smaller percentage target areas in terms of distance and coverage by no-shoot or cover.  I told myself going in to be mindful of those factors.  However, I hadn't done well on classifiers in previous weeks, so I think I pushing things a bit.  While I did better than previous weeks, I know I can do better.  That and I think because I had done well on stages 1-3, that that sort of emboldened me and got away from "the plan". 

Overall, I finished much better than previous weeks, so I was very happy about that.  Will need some time with solid reps with solid foundation and get those automatic.  There were times in the recent match where I had to be more mindful of those recent tweaks, as well as when I caught myself reverting back to old/bad habits.  In any case, was a fun day on the range.  There were a couple of new shooters as well as a few that came back out after being the newbie in a recent match.  Good to have more people interested in the matches and shooting in general. 


changemyoil66

Re: Firearms Training - Sharing Experience
« Reply #179 on: March 02, 2020, 01:13:37 PM »


When I find that my pistol shooting is off, I do a lot of ball and dummy drills.  But prior to that, I was doing some dry manipulations at home and found that my support hand grip crept slightly forward.  I think that was a result of wanting to shoot flatter and exaggerate the "locking out" of my support hand, mostly due to wanting to track the RDS better/faster.  Well, I noticed that that creep resulted in a gap in my grip near the thumb pad of my support hand.  That was something that a keen eye instructor has mentioned a while back.  I had corrected that, but seems to have returned.  So that was one example of a return to solid foundation that I worked on.  Second, was a slight adjustment with the thumb on my shooting hand.  Both of those showed promising results in the ball and dummy drills, as well as showed on paper. 



When the thumb thing returned, was it right off the bat, or more as you fatigued?  So it would be more an endurance issue.