living off the land in hawaii (Read 1187 times)

macsak

living off the land in hawaii
« on: February 28, 2019, 08:08:37 PM »

drck1000

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2019, 01:14:56 PM »
I like how she gave the guy the 3-prong.   ;D  :rofl:

Met her through a few of my good friends who dive often.  She's pretty cool.  She had this video of one of her free dives where she actually scared some scuba divers at a depth of about 100 feet.   :o

RSN172

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2019, 02:00:56 PM »
Like shooting a firearm, be aware off what is beyond your target.

groveler

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2019, 03:11:23 PM »

More Liberal Democrat Natl. Geo. PC, BS.
I could "live off the land"  but only as a farmer/rancher. 
I'm on the Big Island and have animals, cattle, pigs, chickens, garden, solar,
catchment, etc.  so I'm quite capable of dealing with a SHTF event.
We hunt, and fish, but there is not enough fish, game or wild plants out there to
to support the fairly small population on this island, even given its size.
The free dive lady is good. The bow hunter, Meh!  Most guys I know use dogs and
vehicles(I do own a Bow BTW).






drck1000

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2019, 08:04:08 AM »
Like shooting a firearm, be aware off what is beyond your target.
:o  :shake:

That makes my face hurt just looking at it. . .

Surf

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2019, 04:57:34 PM »
Most people have no idea how bad it would become if "the boats stopped coming."  Even those who think they have a plan would quickly find out how ill-prepared they really are.  Only a very very small percent of people who prepare are truly equipped to last a really bad prolonged event.

Q

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2019, 05:18:33 PM »
More Liberal Democrat Natl. Geo. PC, BS.
I could "live off the land"  but only as a farmer/rancher. 
I'm on the Big Island and have animals, cattle, pigs, chickens, garden, solar,
catchment, etc.  so I'm quite capable of dealing with a SHTF event.
We hunt, and fish, but there is not enough fish, game or wild plants out there to
to support the fairly small population on this island, even given its size.
The free dive lady is good. The bow hunter, Meh!  Most guys I know use dogs and
vehicles(I do own a Bow BTW).

Pre-contact Hawaiians supported a population upwards of 800,000 people throughout all 8 islands, with 50% of that total population on the big island. Probably wasn't an easy life, but they were alive nonetheless.

London808

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2019, 07:42:58 PM »
Pre-contact Hawaiians {ARE SAID TO HAVE} supported a population upwards of 800,000 people throughout all 8 islands, with 50% of that total population on the big island. Probably wasn't an easy life, but they were alive nonetheless.
"Mr. Roberts is a bit of a fanatic, he has previously sued HPD about gun registration issues." : Major Richard Robinson 2016

hvybarrels

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2019, 11:51:17 PM »
Food prices are going up. Went to Costco today and got destroyed. People in line are making fun of us but they are all out of shape and have tons of medical problems. Chicken fingers and hot dogs are cheaper but my philosophy is pay now or pay later.

That said I have a couple patches of soil outside that need to be put to use because apparently we don't need to wait for the boats to stop in order to have a food crisis, especially when it comes to fresh produce.
“The workers must be armed and organized…under no pretext should arms and ammunition be surrendered. Any attempt to disarm the workers must be frustrated, by force if necessary.” - Karl Marx

Q

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2019, 04:19:38 PM »
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« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 04:44:55 PM by Q »

Q

Re: living off the land in hawaii
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2019, 04:43:56 PM »


During his travels in the Amazon in the 16th century, explorer Francisco de Orellana reported about a huge civilization stretching across the Amazon, whose populations dwarfed all of the largest cities in Europe, which he estimated to be in the millions. For hundreds of years, they claimed this has to be an exaggeration because there were no traces of these cities, the  "limited technology" of the natives, but more so because soil in the rainforest is actually extremely poor, and to support such a massive population, they would have needed an extensive agriculture system to feed the masses.

In the past 20-30 years, they have actually discovered ruins and networks of these great cities all throughout the Amazon, many of which had been reclaimed and overgrown by the forest. They also discovered that the natives had actually transformed the soil of these areas (likely over hundreds, if not thousands of years), which would have allowed them to implement large scale agriculture greater than anything seen in Europe until the implementation of modern large scale agriculture that we see today, therefore supporting Orellana's claim of the existence of a massive population. Furthermore, the soil they created, known as Terra Preta today, has been demonstrated the ability to improve productivity up to 1000% and bind excess nutrients in the soil for long periods of time, allowing them to potentially and consistently grow crops throughout the year without needing to relocate.

Given the proper management of resources, as well as the fact that Native Hawaiians focused on implementing crops that worked within the Ahupua'a system, I'm not sure why people can't believe they couldn't support a population of up to 800,000 people. As I said: might have really sucked with the amount of resources they actually had access to on the daily, but it is still more likely to be true, given the success of other indigenous civilizations throughout the world that were also able to do so.